A minimalistic model of visually guided obstacle avoidance and path selection behavior

This source preferred by Jan Wiener

Authors: Gerstmayr, L., Mallot, H.A. and Wiener, J.M.

Pages: 87-103

Publisher: Springer

Place of Publication: Berlin, Germany

ISBN: 978-3-540-87600-7

DOI: 10.1007/978-3-540-87601-4_9

In this study we present an empirical experiment investigating obstacle avoidance and path selection behavior in rats and a number of visually-guided models that could account for the empirical data. In the experiment, the animals were repeatedly released into an open arena containing several obstacles and a single feeder that was marked by a large visual landmark. We recorded and analyzed the animals' trajectories as they approached the feeder. We found that the animals adapted their paths according to the specific obstacle configurations not only to avoid the obstacles that were blocking the direct path, but also to select optimal or near-optimal trajectories. On basis of these results, we then develop and present a series of minimalistic models of obstacle avoidance and path selection behavior that are based purely on visual input. In contrast to standard approaches to obstacle avoidance and path planning, our models do not require a map-like representation of space. © 2008 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

This data was imported from DBLP:

Authors: Gerstmayr, L., Mallot, H.A. and Wiener, J.M.

Editors: Freksa, C., Newcombe, N.S., Gärdenfors, P. and Wölfl, S.

http://www.informatik.uni-trier.de/~ley/db/conf/spatialCognition/spatialCognition2008.html

Volume: 5248

Pages: 87-103

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 978-3-540-87600-7

DOI: 10.1007/978-3-540-87601-4_9

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Gerstmayr, L., Mallot, H.A. and Wiener, J.M.

Volume: 5248 LNAI

Pages: 87-103

DOI: 10.1007/978-3-540-87601-4_9

In this study we present an empirical experiment investigating obstacle avoidance and path selection behavior in rats and a number of visually-guided models that could account for the empirical data. In the experiment, the animals were repeatedly released into an open arena containing several obstacles and a single feeder that was marked by a large visual landmark. We recorded and analyzed the animals' trajectories as they approached the feeder. We found that the animals adapted their paths according to the specific obstacle configurations not only to avoid the obstacles that were blocking the direct path, but also to select optimal or near-optimal trajectories. On basis of these results, we then develop and present a series of minimalistic models of obstacle avoidance and path selection behavior that are based purely on visual input. In contrast to standard approaches to obstacle avoidance and path planning, our models do not require a map-like representation of space. © 2008 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

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