Overcoming objectification and dehumanisation in academia

This source preferred by Deborah Gabriel

Authors: Gabriel, D.

Editors: Gabriel, D. and Tate, S.A.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/29409/

https://www.ucl-ioe-press.com/

Publisher: Trentham Books

Place of Publication: London

This chapter is a critical reflection and analysis of being objectified and dehumanised as a Black female academic. Objectification and dehumanisation as the ‘other’ is a typical component of Black women’s raced and gendered experiences (Collins, 1986, 1989). Through critical reflective analysis I aim to highlight the role that objectification and dehumanisation play in maintaining our status as ‘others’ and keeping us on the periphery of academic life. Using Black feminist theory as a critical lens helps me make sense of my experiences through a unique standpoint of and for Black women that involves self-definition and self-valuation as tools of resistance (Collins, 1989). In this chapter I also highlight the role that community networking and sister relationships has played in supporting my survival and progress within academia.

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