Human dimensions of wildlife gardening: Its development, controversies and psychological benefits

This source preferred by Susanna Curtin

Authors: Curtin, S.C. and Fox, D.

Editors: Dixon, G. and Aldous, D.

Volume: 3

Publisher: Springer

A prevalent social discourse concerning climate change, loss of biodiversity and the importance of nature to human health currently dominates news articles, television programmes and political comment. The result of anthropogenic impacts on the natural environment caused by a growing world population, a need for large scale agriculture and unsustainable Co2 emissions has awakened in people an interest in wildlife conservation. Whilst the world’s declining iconic species catch media attention, it is often local and indigenous wildlife that becomes the focus of communities at a local level. Conservation organisation membership has increased over the last 5 years alongside a strong retail sector which encourages people to purchase wild bird food, bird feeders and nest boxes. As interest in feeding the wild birds that visit gardens has increased, so too has an appreciation of the need to consider the wider aspects of the ecosystem such as plants, insects and amphibians which attract and support the birds and mammals that have become more welcome visitors to our gardens.

Many prominent garden attractions in the UK and in the USA have, alongside these growing interests and environmental concerns, developed a wild theme into their garden design which has captured the imagination of garden visitors who wish to marry their love of horticulture with the desire to attract wildlife. Such naturalistic and wild flower planting has thus become a mainstream element of home garden design reflected in the retail sector, media programmes and garden magazines and books.

This source preferred by Dorothy Fox

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Authors: Curtin, S. and Fox, D.

Volume: 3

Pages: 1025-1046

ISBN: 9789401785600

DOI: 10.1007/978-94-017-8560-0_4

© 2014 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht. All rights are reserved. A prevalent social discourse concerning climate change, loss of biodiversity and the importance of nature to human health currently dominates news articles, television programmes and political comment. These anthropogenic impacts on the natural environment question humankind's predominant relationship with nature; particularly in western developed cultures where people are usually perceived as separate from nature rather than part of it. Whilst the world's declining iconic species catch media attention, it is often local and indigenous wildlife that become the focus of communities at a local level. As a result, conservation organisation membership has increased over the last 5 years alongside a strong retail sector which encourages people to purchase, for example, wild bird food, bird feeders and nest boxes. As interest in feeding the wild birds that visit gardens has increased, so too has an appreciation of the need to conserve the wider aspects of the ecosystem such as plants, insects and amphibians which attract and support the birds and mammals that have become more welcome visitors to our gardens. There is also increasing recognition of the health and psychological benefits that wildlife gardening can bring to individuals and communities. Many prominent garden attractions and horticultural shows in England and throughout the world have developed a wild theme into their garden design which has captured the imagination of garden visitors who wish to marry their love of horticulture with their interest in wildlife. Such naturalistic and wild flower planting has thus become a more common element of home garden design reflected in the retail sector, media programmes and garden magazines and books.

The data on this page was last updated at 04:38 on September 19, 2017.