Are Dominant Males More Successful Reproductively?

This source preferred by Amanda Korstjens

Authors: Beziers, P., Hobeika, S. and Korstjens, A.H.

http://content.karger.com/ProdukteDB/produkte.asp?Aktion=Ausgabe&Ausgabe=248356&ProduktNr=223842

Start date: 12 August 2009

Journal: Folia Primatologica

Volume: 80

Pages: 151-152

ISSN: 0015-5713

DOI: 10.1159/000225941

It is viewed that a high ranking position in group-living animals confers certain advantages over other individuals. Red colobus (Procolobus tephrosceles) live in multimale mating systems in which males are ranked in a dominance hierarchy that determines access to receptive females. Females develop extended conspicuous ovulatory and postconception swellings which arouse sexual interest in males and, consequently, promote male-male competition. Since females copulate with several males during their cycle, sperm competition may be another form of male-male competition in this species. Moreover, red colobus are considered as multiple mounters; therefore, sexual selection may have favoured morphological or copulatory patterns that increase reproductive success. In this study, we linked male social rank and sexual behaviour with data on female swelling morphology and reproductive states in a population of 39 wild living red colobus (Procolobus tephrosceles). We found that the priority of access to receptive female, as measured by the monopolisation and the mating frequency, was correlated to the male’s status in the hierarchy. However we found that subordinate males ejaculated more frequently after mounting a female than dominant males, thus, subordinate males use the few available opportunities to their best.

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Authors: Beziers, P., Hobeika, S. and Korstjens, A.H.

Journal: FOLIA PRIMATOLOGICA

Volume: 80

Issue: 2

Pages: 151-152

ISSN: 0015-5713

The data on this page was last updated at 04:44 on September 23, 2017.