Feature-based probability blending

This source preferred by Feng Tian, Christos Gatzidis and John Ferraris

Authors: Ferraris, J., Tian, F. and Gatzidis, C.

http://portal.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=1900354.1900411&coll=DL&dl=GUIDE&CFID=5169950&CFTOKEN=63154795

Start date: 15 December 2010

Publisher: ACM Press

ISBN: 978-1-4503-0524-2

DOI: 10.1145/1900354.1900411

Texture splatting is a terrain texturing technique that has been used in computer games for the last decade [Bloom 2000]. Although its low footprint and GPU-friendliness makes it an attractive candidate for outdoor environments, the use of linear interpolation to blend between different terrain textures can produce "fading" artefacts at transitions. For example, Figure 1 (left) illustrates a brick texture that blends linearly towards an underlying dirt texture. The bricks themselves fade towards increasing translucency, detracting from the plausibility of the scene. A more desirable approach would aim to eliminate or reduce these artefacts by allowing certain features to protrude through the surface of underlying terrain textures. Hardy and McRoberts [2006] reduce these transitional artefacts by using blend maps to emphasize the importance of certain texels within a given terrain texture. Whilst the technique is an improvement over linear blending, the issue of fading artefacts remains (albeit less prominently).

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Ferraris, J., Tian, F. and Gatzidis, C.

Journal: ACM SIGGRAPH ASIA 2010 Posters, SA'10

ISBN: 9781450305242

DOI: 10.1145/1900354.1900411

Texture splatting is a terrain texturing technique that has been used in computer games for the last decade [Bloom 2000]. Although its low footprint and GPU-friendliness makes it an attractive candidate for outdoor environments, the use of linear interpolation to blend between different terrain textures can produce "fading" artefacts at transitions. For example, Figure 1 (left) illustrates a brick texture that blends linearly towards an underlying dirt texture. The bricks themselves fade towards increasing translucency, detracting from the plausibility of the scene. A more desirable approach would aim to eliminate or reduce these artefacts by allowing certain features to protrude through the surface of underlying terrain textures. Hardy and McRoberts [2006] reduce these transitional artefacts by using blend maps to emphasize the importance of certain texels within a given terrain texture. Whilst the technique is an improvement over linear blending, the issue of fading artefacts remains (albeit less prominently).

The data on this page was last updated at 04:42 on November 20, 2017.