Surveying the hackers: The challenges of data collection from a secluded community

Authors: Thackray, Richardson, C., Dogan, H., Taylor, J. and McAlaney, J.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/29671/

Start date: 29 June 2017

There are various challenges with online data collection, from participant recruitment to ensuring the integrity and representativeness of the results; and when the data is being collected from hacking communities who value privacy the challenges become far more interesting. This study was carried out as part of an ongoing PhD project into online communities involved with hacking. This paper will discuss the resources used in designing and implementing internet-based data collection, especially with hard-to-engage participants. Data discussed has been collected via quantitative online surveys. Risks include becoming the target of a cyber-attack. Previous studies have found that research of this type is not universally welcomed in such private communities with reactions ranging from wary to hostile. The findings of this paper offer examples and areas of improvement for online research methodologies as well as reinforcing the importance of social psychological research and human factors within cyber security. The results are beneficial to those wanting to conduct their own online research in challenging areas, as well as those interested in online behaviour and hacking related topics.

This source preferred by John McAlaney, Huseyin Dogan, Helen Thackray, Christopher Richardson and Jacqui Taylor

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Thackray, H., Richardson, C., Dogan, H., Taylor, J. and McAlaney, J.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/29671/

Journal: European Conference on Information Warfare and Security, ECCWS

Pages: 745-748

eISSN: 2048-8610

ISBN: 9781911218432

ISSN: 2048-8602

There are various challenges with online data collection, from participant recruitment to ensuring the integrity and representativeness of the results; and when the data is being collected from hacking communities who value privacy the challenges become far more interesting. This study was carried out as part of an ongoing PhD project into online communities involved with hacking. This paper will discuss the resources used in designing and implementing internet-based data collection, especially with hard-to-engage participants. Data discussed has been collected via quantitative online surveys. Risks include becoming the target of a cyber-attack. Previous studies have found that research of this type is not universally welcomed in such private communities with reactions ranging from wary to hostile. The findings of this paper offer examples and areas of improvement for online research methodologies as well as reinforcing the importance of social psychological research and human factors within cyber security. The results are beneficial to those wanting to conduct their own online research in challenging areas, as well as those interested in online behaviour and hacking related topics.

The data on this page was last updated at 04:42 on November 20, 2017.