Tourism and grey seals in south Devon: management strategies, voluntary controls and tourists' perceptions of disturbance

This source preferred by Susanna Curtin and Steven Richards

Authors: Curtin, S.C., Richards, S. and Westcott, S.M.

Journal: Current Issues in Tourism

Volume: 12

Pages: 59-81

ISSN: 1368-3500

DOI: 10.1080/13683500802295663

Although grey seals are relatively common in Britain, their numbers elsewhere are believed to be decreasing, and some populations in Europe are listed as endangered by the IUCN. This case study focuses on the impacts of seal tourism on a colony of seals on the South Devon coast in the United Kingdom, the effectiveness of current management policies and tourists’ perceptions of the voluntary controls adhered to by tour operators. To monitor impacts, covert observations of the site were undertaken on 60 designated survey days in the summer of 2006, while a survey of tourists taking part in wildlife cruises to the site was conducted during the same period. The observations found that the voluntary codes had reduced disturbance from operators;however, there were still disturbances, mainly from private vessels. The results of the survey showed that tourists were aware of their potential impacts upon the wildlife,and were generally supportive of the voluntary codes in place. Therefore if an honestexplanation and interpretation of the potential impacts of seal tourism are provided, it may encourage a protectionist predisposition in wildlife tourists and render the compliance of voluntary codes a highly satisfactory tourist experience rather than a negative one.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Curtin, S., Richards, S. and Westcott, S.

Journal: Current Issues in Tourism

Volume: 12

Issue: 1

Pages: 59-81

ISSN: 1368-3500

DOI: 10.1080/13683500802295663

Although grey seals are relatively common in Britain, their numbers elsewhere are believed to be decreasing, and some populations in Europe are listed as endangered by the IUCN. This case study focuses on the impacts of seal tourism on a colony of seals on the South Devon coast in the United Kingdom, the effectiveness of current management policies and tourists' perceptions of the voluntary controls adhered to by tour operators. To monitor impacts, covert observations of the site were undertaken on 60 designated survey days in the summer of 2006, while a survey of tourists taking part in wildlife cruises to the site was conducted during the same period. The observations found that the voluntary codes had reduced disturbance from operators; however, there were still disturbances, mainly from private vessels. The results of the survey showed that tourists were aware of their potential impacts upon the wildlife, and were generally supportive of the voluntary codes in place. Therefore if an honest explanation and interpretation of the potential impacts of seal tourism are provided, it may encourage a protectionist predisposition in wildlife tourists and render the compliance of voluntary codes a highly satisfactory tourist experience rather than a negative one. © 2009 Taylor & Francis.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Curtin, S., Richards, S. and Westcott, S.

Journal: CURRENT ISSUES IN TOURISM

Volume: 12

Issue: 1

Pages: 59-81

ISSN: 1368-3500

DOI: 10.1080/13683500802295663

The data on this page was last updated at 04:45 on January 17, 2018.