Understanding the social organisation of maternity care systems: Midwifery as a touchstone

This source preferred by Edwin Van Teijlingen

Authors: Benoit, C., Wrede, S., Bourgeault, I.L., Sandall, J., DeVries, R. and van Teijlingen, E.

Journal: Sociology of Health & Illness

Publication Date: 2005

Volume: 27

Pages: 722-737

ISSN: 0141-9889

DOI: 10.1111/j.1467-9566.2005.00471.x

Theories of professions and healthcare organisation have difficulty in explaining variation in the organisation of maternity services across developed welfare states. Four countries – the United Kingdom, Finland, the Netherlands and Canada – serve as our case examples. While sharing several features, including political and economic systems, publicly-funded universal healthcare and favourable health outcomes, these countries nevertheless have distinct maternity care systems. We use the profession of midwifery, found in all four countries, as a ‘touchstone’ for exploring the sources of this diversity. Our analysis focuses on three key dimensions: (1) welfare state approaches to legalising midwifery and negotiating the role of the midwife in the division of labour; (2) professional boundaries in the maternity care domain; and (3) consumer mobilisation in support of midwifery and around maternity issues.

This data was imported from pubmed:

Authors: Benoit, C., Wrede, S., Bourgeault, I., Sandall, J., De Vries, R. and van Teijlingen, E.R.

Journal: Sociol Health Illn

Publication Date: September 2005

Volume: 27

Issue: 6

Pages: 722-737

ISSN: 0141-9889

DOI: 10.1111/j.1467-9566.2005.00471.x

Theories of professions and healthcare organisation have difficulty in explaining variation in the organisation of maternity services across developed welfare states. Four countries - the United Kingdom, Finland, the Netherlands and Canada - serve as our case examples. While sharing several features, including political and economic systems, publicly-funded universal healthcare and favourable health outcomes, these countries nevertheless have distinct maternity care systems. We use the profession of midwifery, found in all four countries, as a 'touchstone' for exploring the sources of this diversity. Our analysis focuses on three key dimensions: (1) welfare state approaches to legalising midwifery and negotiating the role of the midwife in the division of labour; (2) professional boundaries in the maternity care domain; and (3) consumer mobilisation in support of midwifery and around maternity issues.

This data was imported from scopus:

Authors: Benoit, C., Wrede, S., Bourgeault, I., Sandall, J., De Vries, R. and Van Teijlingen, E.R.

Citations: 40

Journal: Sociology of Health and Illness

Publication Date: September 2005

Volume: 27

Issue: 6

Pages: 722-737

eISSN: 1467-9566

ISSN: 0141-9889

DOI: 10.1111/j.1467-9566.2005.00471.x

Theories of professions and healthcare organisation have difficulty in explaining variation in the organisation of maternity services across developed welfare states. Four countries - the United Kingdom, Finland, the Netherlands and Canada - serve as our case examples. While sharing several features, including political and economic systems, publicly-funded universal healthcare and favourable health outcomes, these countries nevertheless have distinct maternity care systems. We use the profession of midwifery, found in all four countries, as a 'touchstone' for exploring the sources of this diversity. Our analysis focuses on three key dimensions: (1) welfare state approaches to legalising midwifery and negotiating the role of the midwife in the division of labour; (2) professional boundaries in the maternity care domain; and (3) consumer mobilisation in support of midwifery and around maternity issues. © Blackwell Publishing Ltd/Foundation for the Sociology of Health & Illness 2005. Published by Blackwell Publishing.

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