Assimilation of Cd and Cu by the Carnivorous Plant Sarracenia leucophylla Raf. fed Contaminated Prey

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Authors: Moody, C. and Green, I.D.

http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/es9019386

Journal: Environmental Science and Technology

Volume: 44

Pages: 1610-1616

ISSN: 0013-936X

DOI: 10.1021/es9019386

Many species of carnivorous plant have become endangered through exposure to multiple risks such as habitat loss, illegal poaching and pollution. A potential threat to these plants posed by pollution stems from the contamination of their invertebrate prey with trace metals. This study examined the potential for prey to act as sources of the trace metals Cd and Cu for the pitcher plant Sarracenia leucophylla. Cd and Cu contaminated Diptera larvae were fed to S. leucophylla plants in separate experiments. The results demonstrated that both Cd and Cu were readily transferred to the shoots of S. leucophylla in a dose dependant manner. Whilst the assimilation of Cu decreased with treatment level, the assimilation of Cd did not. Some assimilated Cu appeared to be translocated to the roots, but Cd was strongly retained in the shoots, where it was related to a reduction in shoot biomass. This suggested that on exposure to Cd contaminated prey, the plants either experienced phytotoxicity or there was disruption of nutrient acquisition from the prey. Accumulation of Cu was not related to any sign of phytotoxicity.

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Moody, C. and Green, I.D.

Journal: Environ Sci Technol

Volume: 44

Issue: 5

Pages: 1610-1616

ISSN: 0013-936X

DOI: 10.1021/es9019386

Many species of carnivorous plants have become endangered through exposure to multiple risks such as habitat loss, illegal poaching, and pollution. A potential threat to these plants posed by pollution stems from the contamination of their invertebrate prey with trace metals. This study examined the potential for prey to act as sources of the trace metals Cd and Cu for the pitcher plant Sarracenia leucophylla. Cd- and Cu-contaminated Diptera larvae were fed to S. leucophylla plants in separate experiments. The results demonstrated that Cd and Cu were readily transferred to the shoots of S. leucophylla in a dose-dependent manner. While the assimilation of Cu decreased with treatment level, the assimilation of Cd did not. Some assimilated Cu appeared to be translocated to the roots, but Cd was strongly retained in the shoots, where it was related to a reduction in shoot biomass. This suggested that on exposure to Cd-contaminated prey, the plants either experienced phytotoxicity or there was disruption of nutrient acquisition from the prey. Accumulation of Cu was not related to any sign of phytotoxicity.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Christopher, M. and Green, I.D.

Journal: Environmental Science and Technology

Volume: 44

Issue: 5

Pages: 1610-1616

eISSN: 1520-5851

ISSN: 0013-936X

DOI: 10.1021/es9019386

Many species of carnivorous plants have become endangered through exposure to multiple risks such as habitat loss, illegal poaching, and pollution. A potential threat to these plants posed by pollution stems from the contamination of their invertebrate prey with trace metals. This study examined the potential for prey to act as sources of the trace metals Cd and Cu for the pitcher plant Sarracenia leucophylla. Cd- and Cucontaminated Diptera larvae were fed to S. leucophylla plants in separate experiments. The results demonstrated that Cd and Cu were readily transferred to the shoots of S. leucophylla in a dose-dependent manner. While the assimilation of Cu decreased with treatment level, the assimilation of Cd did not. Some assimilated Cu appeared to be translocated to the roots, but Cd was strongly retained in the shoots, where it was related to a reduction in shoot biomass. This suggested that on exposure to Cd-contaminated prey, the plants either experienced phytotoxicity or there was disruption of nutrient acquisition from the prey. Accumulation of Cu was not related to any sign of phytotoxicity. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Moody, C. and Green, I.D.

Journal: ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY

Volume: 44

Issue: 5

Pages: 1610-1616

ISSN: 0013-936X

DOI: 10.1021/es9019386

This data was imported from Europe PubMed Central:

Authors: Moody, C. and Green, I.D.

Journal: Environmental science & technology

Volume: 44

Issue: 5

Pages: 1610-1616

eISSN: 1520-5851

ISSN: 0013-936X

Many species of carnivorous plants have become endangered through exposure to multiple risks such as habitat loss, illegal poaching, and pollution. A potential threat to these plants posed by pollution stems from the contamination of their invertebrate prey with trace metals. This study examined the potential for prey to act as sources of the trace metals Cd and Cu for the pitcher plant Sarracenia leucophylla. Cd- and Cu-contaminated Diptera larvae were fed to S. leucophylla plants in separate experiments. The results demonstrated that Cd and Cu were readily transferred to the shoots of S. leucophylla in a dose-dependent manner. While the assimilation of Cu decreased with treatment level, the assimilation of Cd did not. Some assimilated Cu appeared to be translocated to the roots, but Cd was strongly retained in the shoots, where it was related to a reduction in shoot biomass. This suggested that on exposure to Cd-contaminated prey, the plants either experienced phytotoxicity or there was disruption of nutrient acquisition from the prey. Accumulation of Cu was not related to any sign of phytotoxicity.

The data on this page was last updated at 04:45 on January 17, 2018.