Use and interaction of navigation strategies in regionalized environments

This source preferred by Jan Wiener

Authors: Wiener, J.M., Schnee, A. and Mallot, H.A.

Journal: Journal of Environmental Psychology

Volume: 24

Pages: 475-493

ISSN: 0272-4944

DOI: 10.1016/j.jenvp.2004.09.006

In this work, three experiments are reported that studied the use and interaction of navigation strategies both during the learning of a virtual environment and during subsequent route planning tasks. Special interest concerned the role of regions within the environments. Results from Experiment 1 suggest that the regions are perceived and encoded in spatial memory very early during the process of learning an environment. During navigation such regional information could be used to overcome missing or imprecise spatial information on the detailed level. Experiments 2 and 3 studied the use and interaction of route planning strategies that are applied after an environment has been learned. Results suggest (i) that human route planning takes into account region-connectivity and is not based on place-connectivity alone, (ii) that route planning takes into account the distribution of multiple target locations and (iii) that route planning takes into account the complexity of alternative paths.

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Authors: Wiener, J.M., Schnee, A. and Mallot, H.A.

Journal: Journal of Environmental Psychology

Volume: 24

Issue: 4

Pages: 475-493

ISSN: 0272-4944

DOI: 10.1016/j.jenvp.2004.09.006

In this work, three experiments are reported that studied the use and interaction of navigation strategies both during the learning of a virtual environment and during subsequent route planning tasks. Special interest concerned the role of regions within the environments. Results from Experiment 1 suggest that the regions are perceived and encoded in spatial memory very early during the process of learning an environment. During navigation such regional information could be used to overcome missing or imprecise spatial information on the detailed level. Experiments 2 and 3 studied the use and interaction of route planning strategies that are applied after an environment has been learned. Results suggest (i) that human route planning takes into account region-connectivity and is not based on place-connectivity alone, (ii) that route planning takes into account the distribution of multiple target locations and (iii) that route planning takes into account the complexity of alternative paths. © 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

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