Differential recruitment of the hippocampus, medial prefrontal cortex, and the human motion complex during path integration in humans

This source preferred by Jan Wiener

Authors: Wolbers, T., Wiener, J.M., Mallot, H.A. and Büchel, C.

Journal: Journal of Neuroscience

Volume: 27

Pages: 9408-9416

ISSN: 1529-2401

DOI: 10.1523/JNEUROSCI.2146-07.2007

Path integration, the ability to sense self-motion for keeping track of changes in orientation and position, constitutes a fundamental mechanism of spatial navigation and a keystone for the development of cognitive maps. Whereas animal path integration is predominantly supported by the head-direction, grid, and place cell systems, the neural foundations are not well understood in humans. Here we used functional magnetic resonance imaging and a virtual rendition of a triangle completion paradigm to test whether human path integration recruits a cortical system similar to that of rodents and nonhuman primates. Participants traveled along two legs of a triangle before pointing toward the starting location. In accordance with animal models, stronger right hippocampal activation predicted more accurate updating of the starting location on a trial-by-trial basis. Moreover, between-subjects fluctuations in response consistency were negatively correlated with bilateral hippocampal and medial prefrontal activation, and bilateral recruitment of the human motion complex (hMT+) covaried with individual path integration capability. Given that these effects were absent in a perceptual control task, the present study provides the first evidence that visual path integration is related to the dynamic interplay of self-motion processing in hMT+, higher-level spatial processes in the hippocampus, and spatial working memory in medial prefrontal cortex.

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Wolbers, T., Wiener, J.M., Mallot, H.A. and Büchel, C.

Journal: J Neurosci

Volume: 27

Issue: 35

Pages: 9408-9416

eISSN: 1529-2401

DOI: 10.1523/JNEUROSCI.2146-07.2007

Path integration, the ability to sense self-motion for keeping track of changes in orientation and position, constitutes a fundamental mechanism of spatial navigation and a keystone for the development of cognitive maps. Whereas animal path integration is predominantly supported by the head-direction, grid, and place cell systems, the neural foundations are not well understood in humans. Here we used functional magnetic resonance imaging and a virtual rendition of a triangle completion paradigm to test whether human path integration recruits a cortical system similar to that of rodents and nonhuman primates. Participants traveled along two legs of a triangle before pointing toward the starting location. In accordance with animal models, stronger right hippocampal activation predicted more accurate updating of the starting location on a trial-by-trial basis. Moreover, between-subjects fluctuations in response consistency were negatively correlated with bilateral hippocampal and medial prefrontal activation, and bilateral recruitment of the human motion complex (hMT+) covaried with individual path integration capability. Given that these effects were absent in a perceptual control task, the present study provides the first evidence that visual path integration is related to the dynamic interplay of self-motion processing in hMT+, higher-level spatial processes in the hippocampus, and spatial working memory in medial prefrontal cortex.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Wolbers, T., Wiener, J.M., Mallot, H.A. and Büchel, C.

Journal: Journal of Neuroscience

Volume: 27

Issue: 35

Pages: 9408-9416

eISSN: 0270-6474

ISSN: 0270-6474

DOI: 10.1523/JNEUROSCI.2146-07.2007

Path integration, the ability to sense self-motion for keeping track of changes in orientation and position, constitutes a fundamental mechanism of spatial navigation and a keystone for the development of cognitive maps. Whereas animal path integration is predominantly supported by the head-direction, grid, and place cell systems, the neural foundations are not well understood in humans. Here we used functional magnetic resonance imaging and a virtual rendition of a triangle completion paradigm to test whether human path integration recruits a cortical system similar to that of rodents and nonhuman primates. Participants traveled along two legs of a triangle before pointing toward the starting location. In accordance with animal models, stronger right hippocampal activation predicted more accurate updating of the starting location on a trial-by-trial basis. Moreover, between-subjects fluctuations in response consistency were negatively correlated with bilateral hippocampal and medial prefrontal activation, and bilateral recruitment of the human motion complex (hMT+) covaried with individual path integration capability. Given that these effects were absent in a perceptual control task, the present study provides the first evidence that visual path integration is related to the dynamic interplay of self-motion processing in hMT+, higher-level spatial processes in the hippocampus, and spatial working memory in medial prefrontal cortex. Copyright © 2007 Society for Neuroscience.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Wolbers, T., Wiener, J.M., Mallot, H.A. and Buechel, C.

Journal: JOURNAL OF NEUROSCIENCE

Volume: 27

Issue: 35

Pages: 9408-9416

ISSN: 0270-6474

DOI: 10.1523/JNEUROSCI.2146-07.2007

This data was imported from Europe PubMed Central:

Authors: Wolbers, T., Wiener, J.M., Mallot, H.A. and Büchel, C.

Journal: The Journal of neuroscience : the official journal of the Society for Neuroscience

Volume: 27

Issue: 35

Pages: 9408-9416

eISSN: 1529-2401

ISSN: 0270-6474

Path integration, the ability to sense self-motion for keeping track of changes in orientation and position, constitutes a fundamental mechanism of spatial navigation and a keystone for the development of cognitive maps. Whereas animal path integration is predominantly supported by the head-direction, grid, and place cell systems, the neural foundations are not well understood in humans. Here we used functional magnetic resonance imaging and a virtual rendition of a triangle completion paradigm to test whether human path integration recruits a cortical system similar to that of rodents and nonhuman primates. Participants traveled along two legs of a triangle before pointing toward the starting location. In accordance with animal models, stronger right hippocampal activation predicted more accurate updating of the starting location on a trial-by-trial basis. Moreover, between-subjects fluctuations in response consistency were negatively correlated with bilateral hippocampal and medial prefrontal activation, and bilateral recruitment of the human motion complex (hMT+) covaried with individual path integration capability. Given that these effects were absent in a perceptual control task, the present study provides the first evidence that visual path integration is related to the dynamic interplay of self-motion processing in hMT+, higher-level spatial processes in the hippocampus, and spatial working memory in medial prefrontal cortex.

The data on this page was last updated at 04:47 on December 17, 2017.