Development and preliminary evaluation of a cognitive behavioural approach to fatigue management in people with multiple sclerosis

This source preferred by Sarah Thomas, Peter Thomas and Roger Baker

Authors: Thomas, S., Thomas, P., Nock, A., Slingsby, V., Galvin, K.T., Baker, R., Moffat, N. and Hillier, C.

Journal: Patient Education and Counseling

Volume: 78

Pages: 240-249

ISSN: 0738-3991

DOI: 10.1016/j.pec.2009.07.001

Objectives

(i) To develop a group-based intervention for the management of multiple sclerosis (MS) fatigue incorporating energy effectiveness and cognitive behavioural approaches and (ii) to undertake a process and preliminary evaluation.

Methods

Drawing upon a literature search, a local model of good practice and the views of service users and health professionals, a manualised group-based fatigue management programme was developed, designed to be delivered by health professionals. A process and preliminary outcome evaluation was undertaken. Sixteen participants attended across two iterations. Participant feedback, obtained via a focus group and evaluation questionnaires, was used to refine the programme. Outcomes were collected pre- and post-programme (including fatigue severity, quality of life, self-efficacy).

Results

Focus group feedback suggested the programme was well received, reflected in high attendance and positive ratings on evaluation questionnaires. At follow-up, despite the small sample size, there were significant improvements in perceived self-efficacy for managing fatigue.

Conclusion

An evidence-based fatigue management intervention has been developed and preliminary findings look promising. In the next phase we will examine whether the programme transfers satisfactorily to other centres and collect data in preparation for a randomised controlled trial (RCT).

Practice implications

Implications for practice will emerge when the results of our RCT are published.

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Thomas, S., Thomas, P.W., Nock, A., Slingsby, V., Galvin, K., Baker, R., Moffat, N. and Hillier, C.

Journal: Patient Educ Couns

Volume: 78

Issue: 2

Pages: 240-249

eISSN: 1873-5134

DOI: 10.1016/j.pec.2009.07.001

OBJECTIVES: (i) To develop a group-based intervention for the management of multiple sclerosis (MS) fatigue incorporating energy effectiveness and cognitive behavioural approaches and (ii) to undertake a process and preliminary evaluation. METHODS: Drawing upon a literature search, a local model of good practice and the views of service users and health professionals, a manualised group-based fatigue management programme was developed, designed to be delivered by health professionals. A process and preliminary outcome evaluation was undertaken. Sixteen participants attended across two iterations. Participant feedback, obtained via a focus group and evaluation questionnaires, was used to refine the programme. Outcomes were collected pre- and post-programme (including fatigue severity, quality of life, self-efficacy). RESULTS: Focus group feedback suggested the programme was well received, reflected in high attendance and positive ratings on evaluation questionnaires. At follow-up, despite the small sample size, there were significant improvements in perceived self-efficacy for managing fatigue. CONCLUSION: An evidence-based fatigue management intervention has been developed and preliminary findings look promising. In the next phase we will examine whether the programme transfers satisfactorily to other centres and collect data in preparation for a randomised controlled trial (RCT). PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: Implications for practice will emerge when the results of our RCT are published.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Thomas, S., Thomas, P.W., Nock, A., Slingsby, V., Galvin, K., Baker, R., Moffat, N. and Hillier, C.

Journal: Patient Education and Counseling

Volume: 78

Issue: 2

Pages: 240-249

ISSN: 0738-3991

DOI: 10.1016/j.pec.2009.07.001

Objectives: (i) To develop a group-based intervention for the management of multiple sclerosis (MS) fatigue incorporating energy effectiveness and cognitive behavioural approaches and (ii) to undertake a process and preliminary evaluation. Methods: Drawing upon a literature search, a local model of good practice and the views of service users and health professionals, a manualised group-based fatigue management programme was developed, designed to be delivered by health professionals. A process and preliminary outcome evaluation was undertaken. Sixteen participants attended across two iterations. Participant feedback, obtained via a focus group and evaluation questionnaires, was used to refine the programme. Outcomes were collected pre- and post-programme (including fatigue severity, quality of life, self-efficacy). Results: Focus group feedback suggested the programme was well received, reflected in high attendance and positive ratings on evaluation questionnaires. At follow-up, despite the small sample size, there were significant improvements in perceived self-efficacy for managing fatigue. Conclusion: An evidence-based fatigue management intervention has been developed and preliminary findings look promising. In the next phase we will examine whether the programme transfers satisfactorily to other centres and collect data in preparation for a randomised controlled trial (RCT). Practice implications: Implications for practice will emerge when the results of our RCT are published. © 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Thomas, S., Thomas, P.W., Nock, A., Slingsby, V., Galvin, K., Baker, R., Moffat, N. and Hillier, C.

Journal: PATIENT EDUCATION AND COUNSELING

Volume: 78

Issue: 2

Pages: 240-249

ISSN: 0738-3991

DOI: 10.1016/j.pec.2009.07.001

This data was imported from Europe PubMed Central:

Authors: Thomas, S., Thomas, P.W., Nock, A., Slingsby, V., Galvin, K., Baker, R., Moffat, N. and Hillier, C.

Journal: Patient education and counseling

Volume: 78

Issue: 2

Pages: 240-249

eISSN: 1873-5134

ISSN: 0738-3991

OBJECTIVES: (i) To develop a group-based intervention for the management of multiple sclerosis (MS) fatigue incorporating energy effectiveness and cognitive behavioural approaches and (ii) to undertake a process and preliminary evaluation. METHODS: Drawing upon a literature search, a local model of good practice and the views of service users and health professionals, a manualised group-based fatigue management programme was developed, designed to be delivered by health professionals. A process and preliminary outcome evaluation was undertaken. Sixteen participants attended across two iterations. Participant feedback, obtained via a focus group and evaluation questionnaires, was used to refine the programme. Outcomes were collected pre- and post-programme (including fatigue severity, quality of life, self-efficacy). RESULTS: Focus group feedback suggested the programme was well received, reflected in high attendance and positive ratings on evaluation questionnaires. At follow-up, despite the small sample size, there were significant improvements in perceived self-efficacy for managing fatigue. CONCLUSION: An evidence-based fatigue management intervention has been developed and preliminary findings look promising. In the next phase we will examine whether the programme transfers satisfactorily to other centres and collect data in preparation for a randomised controlled trial (RCT). PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: Implications for practice will emerge when the results of our RCT are published.

The data on this page was last updated at 04:47 on December 18, 2017.