A naturalistic longitudinal evaluation of counselling in primary care

This source preferred by Peter Thomas, Roger Baker and Helen Allen

Authors: Baker, R., Baker, E., Golden, S., Allen, H., Thomas, P., Hollingbery, T., Newth, J. and Gibson, S.

http://www.informaworld.com/smpp/content?content=10.1080/0951507021000050195

Journal: Counselling Psychology Quarterly

Volume: 15

Pages: 359-373

ISSN: 0951-5070

DOI: 10.1080/0951507021000050195

This study evaluated the effectiveness of generic counselling in a primary healthcare setting during three months of counselling and followed up the patients' progress after counselling had finished for the next twenty-one months. Questionnaires were completed by patients within the Dorset Primary Care counselling service on referral to counselling and at set points afterwards. A naturally occurring waiting-list group was compared with patients receiving counselling at baseline and three months. Measurements were taken of patients' psychiatric symptomatology, quality of life (QOL) and self-esteem. Patients who received counselling made highly significant improvements compared with those on the waiting list. These improvements were maintained throughout the long-term follow-up. This would indicate that generic counselling has positive effects that can be maintained for a long period of time after counselling has been completed.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Baker, R., Baker, E., Allen, H., Golden, S., Thomas, P., Hollingbery, T., Newth, J. and Gibson, S.

Journal: Counselling Psychology Quarterly

Volume: 15

Issue: 4

Pages: 359-373

ISSN: 0951-5070

DOI: 10.1080/0951507021000050195

This study evaluated the effectiveness of generic counselling in a primary healthcare setting during three months of counselling and followed up the patients' progress after counselling had finished for the next twenty-one months. Questionnaires were completed by patients within the Dorset Primary Care counselling service on referral to counselling and at set points afterwards. A naturally occurring waiting-list group was compared with patients receiving counselling at baseline and three months. Measurements were taken of patients' psychiatric symptomatology, quality of life (QOL) and self-esteem. Patients who received counselling made highly significant improvements compared with those on the waiting list. These improvements were maintained throughout the long-term follow-up. This would indicate that generic counselling has positive effects that can be maintained for a long period of time after counselling has been completed.

The data on this page was last updated at 04:39 on October 19, 2017.