Evidence for contemporary evolution during Darwin's lifetime

This source preferred by Rick Stafford

Authors: Hart, A.G., Stafford, R., Smith, A.L. and Goodenough, A.E.

Journal: Current Biology

Volume: 20

Pages: R95

ISSN: 0960-9822

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Hart, A.G., Stafford, R., Smith, A.L. and Goodenough, A.E.

Journal: Curr Biol

Volume: 20

Issue: 3

Pages: R95

eISSN: 1879-0445

DOI: 10.1016/j.cub.2009.12.010

Darwin's On the Origin of Species[1] introduced the world to the most fundamental concept in biological sciences - evolution. However, in the 150 years following publication of his seminal work, much has been made of the fact that Darwin was missing at least one crucial link in his chain of evidence - he had no evidence for contemporary evolution through natural selection. Indeed, as one commentator noted on the centenary of the publication of Origin, "Had Darwin observed industrial melanism he would have seen evolution occurring not in thousands of years but in thousands of days - well within his lifetime. He would have witnessed the consummation and confirmation of his life's work"[2].

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Hart, A.G., Stafford, R., Smith, A.L. and Goodenough, A.E.

Journal: Current Biology

Volume: 20

Issue: 3

ISSN: 0960-9822

DOI: 10.1016/j.cub.2009.12.010

Darwin's On the Origin of Species [1] introduced the world to the most fundamental concept in biological sciences - evolution. However, in the 150 years following publication of his seminal work, much has been made of the fact that Darwin was missing at least one crucial link in his chain of evidence - he had no evidence for contemporary evolution through natural selection. Indeed, as one commentator noted on the centenary of the publication of Origin, "Had Darwin observed industrial melanism he would have seen evolution occurring not in thousands of years but in thousands of days - well within his lifetime. He would have witnessed the consummation and confirmation of his life's work" [2]. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Hart, A.G., Stafford, R., Smith, A.L. and Goodenough, A.E.

Journal: CURRENT BIOLOGY

Volume: 20

Issue: 3

Pages: R95

ISSN: 0960-9822

This data was imported from Europe PubMed Central:

Authors: Hart, A.G., Stafford, R., Smith, A.L. and Goodenough, A.E.

Journal: Current biology : CB

Volume: 20

Issue: 3

Pages: R95

eISSN: 1879-0445

ISSN: 0960-9822

Darwin's On the Origin of Species[1] introduced the world to the most fundamental concept in biological sciences - evolution. However, in the 150 years following publication of his seminal work, much has been made of the fact that Darwin was missing at least one crucial link in his chain of evidence - he had no evidence for contemporary evolution through natural selection. Indeed, as one commentator noted on the centenary of the publication of Origin, "Had Darwin observed industrial melanism he would have seen evolution occurring not in thousands of years but in thousands of days - well within his lifetime. He would have witnessed the consummation and confirmation of his life's work"[2].

The data on this page was last updated at 08:57 on May 24, 2017.