Retinally-generated saccadic suppression of a locust looming-detector neuron: investigations using a robot locust

This source preferred by Rick Stafford

Authors: Santer, R.D., Stafford, R. and Rind, F.C.

Journal: Journal of the Royal Society Interface

Volume: 1

Pages: 61-77

ISSN: 1742-5689

DOI: 10.1098/rsif.2004.0007

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Santer, R.D., Stafford, R. and Rind, F.C.

Journal: J R Soc Interface

Volume: 1

Issue: 1

Pages: 61-77

ISSN: 1742-5689

DOI: 10.1098/rsif.2004.0007

A fundamental task performed by many visual systems is to distinguish apparent motion caused by eye movements from real motion occurring within the environment. During saccadic eye movements, this task is achieved by inhibitory signals of central and retinal origin that suppress the output of motion-detecting neurons. To investigate the retinally-generated component of this suppression, we used a computational model of a locust looming-detecting pathway that experiences saccadic suppression. This model received input from the camera of a mobile robot that performed simple saccade-like movements, allowing the model's response to simplified real stimuli to be tested. Retinally-generated saccadic suppression resulted from two inhibitory mechanisms within the looming-detector's input architecture. One mechanism fed inhibition forward through the network, inhibiting the looming-detector's initial response to movement. The second spread inhibition laterally within the network, suppressing the looming-detector's maintained response to movement. These mechanisms prevent a looming-detector model response to whole-field visual stimuli. In the locust, this mechanism of saccadic suppression may operate in addition to centrally-generated suppression. Because lateral inhibition is a common feature of early visual processing in many organisms, we discuss whether the mechanism of retinally-generated saccadic suppression found in the locust looming-detector model may also operate in these species.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Santer, R.D., Stafford, R. and Rind, F.C.

Journal: Journal of the Royal Society Interface

Volume: 1

Issue: 1

Pages: 61-77

eISSN: 1742-5662

ISSN: 1742-5689

DOI: 10.1098/rsif.2004.0007

A fundamental task performed by many visual systems is to distinguish apparent motion caused by eye movements from real motion occurring within the environment. During saccadic eye movements, this task is achieved by inhibitory signals of central and retinal origin that suppress the output of motion-detecting neurons. To investigate the retinally-generated component of this suppression, we used a computational model of a locust looming-detecting pathway that experiences saccadic suppression. This model received input from the camera of a mobile robot that performed simple saccade-like movements, allowing the model's response to simplified real stimuli to be tested. Retinally-generated saccadic suppression resulted from two inhibitory mechanisms within the looming-detector's input architecture. One mechanism fed inhibition forward through the network, inhibiting the looming-detector's initial response to movement. The second spread inhibition laterally within the network, suppressing the looming-detector's maintained response to movement. These mechanisms prevent a looming-detector model response to whole-field visual stimuli. In the locust, this mechanism of saccadic suppression may operate in addition to centrally-generated suppression. Because lateral inhibition is a common feature of early visual processing in many organisms, we discuss whether the mechanism of retinally-generated saccadic suppression found in the locust looming-detector model may also operate in these species. © 2004 The Royal Society.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Santer, R.D., Stafford, R. and Rind, F.C.

Journal: JOURNAL OF THE ROYAL SOCIETY INTERFACE

Volume: 1

Issue: 1

Pages: 61-77

ISSN: 1742-5689

DOI: 10.1098/rsif.2004.0007

This data was imported from Europe PubMed Central:

Authors: Santer, R.D., Stafford, R. and Rind, F.C.

Journal: Journal of the Royal Society, Interface

Volume: 1

Issue: 1

Pages: 61-77

eISSN: 1742-5662

ISSN: 1742-5689

A fundamental task performed by many visual systems is to distinguish apparent motion caused by eye movements from real motion occurring within the environment. During saccadic eye movements, this task is achieved by inhibitory signals of central and retinal origin that suppress the output of motion-detecting neurons. To investigate the retinally-generated component of this suppression, we used a computational model of a locust looming-detecting pathway that experiences saccadic suppression. This model received input from the camera of a mobile robot that performed simple saccade-like movements, allowing the model's response to simplified real stimuli to be tested. Retinally-generated saccadic suppression resulted from two inhibitory mechanisms within the looming-detector's input architecture. One mechanism fed inhibition forward through the network, inhibiting the looming-detector's initial response to movement. The second spread inhibition laterally within the network, suppressing the looming-detector's maintained response to movement. These mechanisms prevent a looming-detector model response to whole-field visual stimuli. In the locust, this mechanism of saccadic suppression may operate in addition to centrally-generated suppression. Because lateral inhibition is a common feature of early visual processing in many organisms, we discuss whether the mechanism of retinally-generated saccadic suppression found in the locust looming-detector model may also operate in these species.

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