'Heavy metal' - Time to move on from semantics to pragmatics?

This source preferred by Roger Herbert

Authors: Huebner, R., Astin, K.B. and Herbert, R.J.H.

Journal: Journal of Environmental Monitoring

Volume: 12

Pages: 1511-1514

ISSN: 1464-0325

DOI: 10.1039/c0em00056f

Despite the repeated calls to stop, most notably in a technical publication of the International Union for Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC), the use of the term ‘heavy metal’ appears not to have declined in the scientific literature and there is little evidence that the IUPAC instructions and those of other publications have had any measurable impact on this widespread usage. Indeed, the use of the term is increasing rather than declining. Four options are presented to solve this dilemma.

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Hübner, R., Astin, K.B. and Herbert, R.J.H.

Journal: J Environ Monit

Volume: 12

Issue: 8

Pages: 1511-1514

eISSN: 1464-0333

DOI: 10.1039/c0em00056f

Despite the repeated calls to stop, most notably in a technical publication of the International Union for Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC), the use of the term 'heavy metal' appears not to have declined in the scientific literature and there is little evidence that the IUPAC instructions and those of other publications have had any measurable impact on this widespread usage. Indeed, the use of the term is increasing rather than declining. Four options are presented to solve this dilemma.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Hübner, R., Astin, K.B. and Herbert, R.J.H.

Journal: Journal of Environmental Monitoring

Volume: 12

Issue: 8

Pages: 1511-1514

ISSN: 1464-0325

DOI: 10.1039/c0em00056f

Despite the repeated calls to stop, most notably in a technical publication of the International Union for Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC), the use of the term 'heavy metal' appears not to have declined in the scientific literature and there is little evidence that the IUPAC instructions and those of other publications have had any measurable impact on this widespread usage. Indeed, the use of the term is increasing rather than declining. Four options are presented to solve this dilemma. © 2010 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

This data was imported from Europe PubMed Central:

Authors: Hübner, R., Astin, K.B. and Herbert, R.J.

Journal: Journal of environmental monitoring : JEM

Volume: 12

Issue: 8

Pages: 1511-1514

eISSN: 1464-0333

ISSN: 1464-0325

Despite the repeated calls to stop, most notably in a technical publication of the International Union for Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC), the use of the term 'heavy metal' appears not to have declined in the scientific literature and there is little evidence that the IUPAC instructions and those of other publications have had any measurable impact on this widespread usage. Indeed, the use of the term is increasing rather than declining. Four options are presented to solve this dilemma.

The data on this page was last updated at 04:42 on November 20, 2017.