An emerging model for publishing and using open educational resources in public health

This source preferred by Ann Hemingway, Heather Hartwell and Catherine Angell

Authors: Hemingway, A., Angell, C., Hartwell, H. and Heller, R.

Journal: Perspectives in Public Health

Volume: 131

Pages: 38-43

ISSN: 1757-9139

DOI: 10.1177/175913910391034

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Hemingway, A., Angell, C., Hartwell, H. and Heller, R.F.

Journal: Perspect Public Health

Volume: 131

Issue: 1

Pages: 38-43

ISSN: 1757-9139

DOI: 10.1177/1757913910391034

INTRODUCTION: The open source revolution has enabled the development of open educational resources (OER) and the potential for sharing lessons learned. We present a potential model for publishing OER in public health to inform workforce development. METHODS: As part of the PHORUS (Public Health Open Resources for the University Sector) Project, a review of the literature relating to the development of OER was followed by an online search for OER resources relating specifically to public health. Furthermore, a Delphi study was conducted to identify and prioritize barriers and enablers to the production and use of public health OER. RESULTS: A wide array of OER literature was identified, although there were a limited number of public health-related papers. The key concepts influencing public health OER release found in the literature were identified as quality, ethics and values, rewards, risks and practical aspects, such as technological developments. These concepts were then further developed through the PHORUS project research findings to produce the basis of a potential model for OER development in public health. DISCUSSION/CONCLUSION: The synthesis of a literature review and Delphi study has produced a potential model to guide the development of OER in public health. The model provides a matrix where the questions about whether and how an academic can produce and publish OER are answered, according to various risks and benefits to them and their institution. We hope that this will provide practical assistance and encouragement for the academic public health community to create and share OER.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Hemingway, A., Angell, C., Hartwell, H. and Heller, R.F.

Journal: Perspectives in Public Health

Volume: 131

Issue: 1

Pages: 38-43

ISSN: 1757-9139

DOI: 10.1177/1757913910391034

Introduction: The open source revolution has enabled the development of open educational resources (OER) and the potential for sharing lessons learned. We present a potential model for publishing OER in public health to inform workforce development. Methods: As part of the PHORUS (Public Health Open Resources for the University Sector) Project, a review of the literature relating to the development of OER was followed by an online search for OER resources relating specifically to public health. Furthermore, a Delphi study was conducted to identify and prioritize barriers and enablers to the production and use of public health OER. Results: A wide array of OER literature was identified, although there were a limited Number of public health-related papers. The key concepts influencing public health OER release found in the literature were identified as quality, ethics and values, rewards, risks and practical aspects, such as technological developments. These concepts were then further developed through the PHORUS project research findings to produce the basis of a potential model for OER development in public health. Discussion/Conclusion: The synthesis of a literature review and Delphi study has produced a potential model to guide the development of OER in public health. The model provides a matrix where the questions about whether and how an academic can produce and publish OER are answered, according to various risks and benefits to them and their institution. We hope that this will provide practical assistance and encouragement for the academic public health community to create and share OER. © Royal Society for Public Health 2011.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Hemingway, A., Angell, C., Hartwell, H. and Heller, R.F.

Journal: PERSPECTIVES IN PUBLIC HEALTH

Volume: 131

Issue: 1

Pages: 38-43

ISSN: 1757-9139

DOI: 10.1177/1757913910391034

This data was imported from Europe PubMed Central:

Authors: Hemingway, A., Angell, C., Hartwell, H. and Heller, R.F.

Journal: Perspectives in public health

Volume: 131

Issue: 1

Pages: 38-43

eISSN: 1757-9147

ISSN: 1757-9139

INTRODUCTION: The open source revolution has enabled the development of open educational resources (OER) and the potential for sharing lessons learned. We present a potential model for publishing OER in public health to inform workforce development. METHODS: As part of the PHORUS (Public Health Open Resources for the University Sector) Project, a review of the literature relating to the development of OER was followed by an online search for OER resources relating specifically to public health. Furthermore, a Delphi study was conducted to identify and prioritize barriers and enablers to the production and use of public health OER. RESULTS: A wide array of OER literature was identified, although there were a limited number of public health-related papers. The key concepts influencing public health OER release found in the literature were identified as quality, ethics and values, rewards, risks and practical aspects, such as technological developments. These concepts were then further developed through the PHORUS project research findings to produce the basis of a potential model for OER development in public health. DISCUSSION/CONCLUSION: The synthesis of a literature review and Delphi study has produced a potential model to guide the development of OER in public health. The model provides a matrix where the questions about whether and how an academic can produce and publish OER are answered, according to various risks and benefits to them and their institution. We hope that this will provide practical assistance and encouragement for the academic public health community to create and share OER.

The data on this page was last updated at 04:43 on November 23, 2017.