Written in the mud: (Proto)Zine-making and autonomous media at the Greenham Common Women's Peace Camp

This source preferred by Anna Feigenbaum

Authors: Feigenbaum, A.

Journal: Feminist Media Studies

DOI: 10.1080/14680777.2011.647964

From the early months of the Greenham Common Women’s Peace Camp protests, women wishingto offer different perspectives from those found in the corporate press, created their ownnewsletters and booklets. These print publications incorporated a wide and vibrant array of anecdotes, analyses and images of life at the camp. They served to mobilize new participants,circulate information about events, document women’s actions and create forums for cultivatingideas, demands, tactics and analyses. In this paper, I look at how Greenham publicationsfunctioned simultaneously as instrumental tools and affective sites of knowledge production.I situate these women’s publications in regard to the histories and political trajectories of zine-making, arguing that the ethics and values that shaped Greenham women’s publications share agreat deal of similarities with zine-making cultures and cultural productions. In doing so I offer analternative approach to the historicization of DIY publishing and feminist grassroots media that focuses on the dynamics of autonomous media practices pre and post-internet.

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Authors: Feigenbaum, A.

Journal: Feminist Media Studies

Volume: 13

Issue: 1

Pages: 1-13

eISSN: 1471-5902

ISSN: 1468-0777

DOI: 10.1080/14680777.2011.647964

From the early months of the Greenham Common Women's Peace Camp protests, women wishing to offer different perspectives from those found in the corporate press, created their own newsletters and booklets. These print publications incorporated a wide and vibrant array of anecdotes, analyses and images of life at the camp. They served to mobilize new participants, circulate information about events, document women's actions and create forums for cultivating ideas, demands, tactics and analyses. In this paper, I look at how Greenham publications functioned simultaneously as instrumental tools and affective sites of knowledge production. I situate these women's publications in regard to the histories and political trajectories of zine-making, arguing that the ethics and values that shaped Greenham women's publications share a great deal of similarities with zine-making cultures and cultural productions. In doing so I offer an alternative approach to the historicization of DIY publishing and feminist grassroots media that focuses on the dynamics of autonomous media practices pre and post-internet. © 2013 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

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