Slow travel: issues for tourism and climate change

This source preferred by Janet Dickinson and Derek Robbins

Authors: Dickinson, J.E., Lumsdon, L. and Robbins, D.K.

Journal: Journal of Sustainable Tourism

Volume: 19

Pages: 281-300

ISSN: 0966-9582

DOI: 10.1080/09669582.2010.524704

This paper analyses the eclectic evolution of slow travel, examines key features and interpretations, and develops a slow travel framework as an alternative way of conceptualising holidays in the future. The paper focuses on slow travel’s potential to respond to the challenges of climatic change: travel currently accounts for 50- 97.5% of the overall emissions impact of most tourism trips. In-depth interviews with self-identified slow travellers illustrate and underpin the concept and note that slow travellers form a continuum from “soft” to “hard” slow travellers. The paper explores time as a social institution, timeless time and fragmented time, travel as an integral part of the tourist experience, and the links between tourism and the travellers’ self-identity and life styles. Special attention is given to people and place engagement, to behavioural choice and decision making psychology, and to the role and growth of web communities. Slow travel is shown to require both holiday type/style choices and travel mode choices. Walking, cycling, travel using bus, coach and train all facilitate slow travel, while air and car travel do not. Slow travel prompts a reassessment of how tourism interfaces with transport.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Dickinson, J.E., Lumsdon, L.M. and Robbins, D.

Journal: Journal of Sustainable Tourism

Volume: 19

Issue: 3

Pages: 281-300

ISSN: 0966-9582

DOI: 10.1080/09669582.2010.524704

This paper analyses the eclectic evolution of slow travel, examines key features and interpretations, and develops a slow travel framework as an alternative way of conceptualising holidays in the future. The paper focuses on slow travel's potential to respond to the challenges of climatic change: travel currently accounts for 50-97.5% of the overall emissions impact of most tourism trips. In-depth interviews with self-identified slow travellers illustrate and underpin the concept and note that slow travellers form a continuum from "soft" to "hard" slow travellers. The paper explores time as a social institution, timeless time and fragmented time, travel as an integral part of the tourist experience, and the links between tourism and the travellers' self-identity and lifestyles. Special attention is given to people and place engagement, to behavioural choice and decision-making psychology, and to the role and growth of web communities. Slow travel is shown to require both holiday type/style choices and travel mode choices. Walking, cycling, travel using bus, coach and train all facilitate slow travel, while air and car travel do not. Slow travel prompts a reassessment of how tourism interfaces with transport. © 2011 Taylor & Francis.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Dickinson, J.E., Lumsdon, L.M. and Robbins, D.

Journal: JOURNAL OF SUSTAINABLE TOURISM

Volume: 19

Issue: 3

Pages: 281-300

ISSN: 0966-9582

DOI: 10.1080/09669582.2010.524704

The data on this page was last updated at 04:42 on September 20, 2017.