Older people's recruitment, sustained participation, and adherence to falls prevention interventions in institutional settings: a supplement to the Cochrane systematic review

This source preferred by Samuel Nyman

Authors: Nyman, S.R. and Victor, C.R.

http://ageing.oxfordjournals.org/content/40/4/430.full

Journal: Age and Ageing

Volume: 40

Pages: 430-436

ISSN: 0002-0729

DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afr016

Background: randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of falls prevention conducted in institutional settings have recently been systematically reviewed. Objective: to supplement this review by analysing older people's participation in the trials and engagement with the interventions. Design: review of the 41 RCTs included in the Cochrane systematic review of falls prevention interventions. Setting: hospitals and nursing care facilities. Participants: adults aged/mean age of 65+. Methods: calculated aggregate data on recruitment (inclusion into the trial), attrition at 12-month follow-up (loss of participants from the trial), adherence (to intervention protocol), and whether adherence moderated the effect of interventions on trial outcomes. Results: the median inclusion rate was 48.5% (38.9–84.5%). At 12 months the median attrition rate was 10.4% (3.9–12.3%, n = 10) or with the inclusion of mortality 16.2% (9.5–17.1%, n = 11). Adherence was high for exercise that was individually targeted (e.g. 89% physical therapy) and group based (72–88%) and for medication interventions (68–88%). For multifactorial interventions, adherence ranged from 11% for attending 60+/88 of exercise classes to 93% for use/repairs of aids. Adherence as a moderator of treatment effectiveness was tested in nursing care facilities (n = 6) and positively identified in three studies for medication and multifactorial interventions. Conclusions: using median rates for recruitment (50%), attrition (15%) and adherence (80%), by 12 months, it is estimated that on average only a third of nursing care facility residents are likely to be adhering to falls prevention interventions.

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Nyman, S.R. and Victor, C.R.

Journal: Age Ageing

Volume: 40

Issue: 4

Pages: 430-436

eISSN: 1468-2834

DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afr016

BACKGROUND: randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of falls prevention conducted in institutional settings have recently been systematically reviewed. OBJECTIVE: to supplement this review by analysing older people's participation in the trials and engagement with the interventions. DESIGN: review of the 41 RCTs included in the Cochrane systematic review of falls prevention interventions. SETTING: hospitals and nursing care facilities. PARTICIPANTS: adults aged/mean age of 65+. METHODS: calculated aggregate data on recruitment (inclusion into the trial), attrition at 12-month follow-up (loss of participants from the trial), adherence (to intervention protocol), and whether adherence moderated the effect of interventions on trial outcomes. RESULTS: the median inclusion rate was 48.5% (38.9-84.5%). At 12 months the median attrition rate was 10.4% (3.9-12.3%, n = 10) or with the inclusion of mortality 16.2% (9.5-17.1%, n = 11). Adherence was high for exercise that was individually targeted (e.g. 89% physical therapy) and group based (72-88%) and for medication interventions (68-88%). For multifactorial interventions, adherence ranged from 11% for attending 60+/88 of exercise classes to 93% for use/repairs of aids. Adherence as a moderator of treatment effectiveness was tested in nursing care facilities (n = 6) and positively identified in three studies for medication and multifactorial interventions. CONCLUSIONS: using median rates for recruitment (50%), attrition (15%) and adherence (80%), by 12 months, it is estimated that on average only a third of nursing care facility residents are likely to be adhering to falls prevention interventions.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Nyman, S.R. and Victor, C.R.

Journal: Age and Ageing

Volume: 40

Issue: 4

Pages: 430-436

eISSN: 1468-2834

ISSN: 0002-0729

DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afr016

Background: randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of falls prevention conducted in institutional settings have recently been systematically reviewed. Objective: to supplement this review by analysing older people's participation in the trials and engagement with the interventions. Design: review of the 41 RCTs included in the Cochrane systematic review of falls prevention interventions. Setting: hospitals and nursing care facilities. Participants: adults aged/mean age of 65+.Methods: calculated aggregate data on recruitment (inclusion into the trial), attrition at 12-month follow-up (loss of participants from the trial), adherence (to intervention protocol), and whether adherence moderated the effect of interventions on trial outcomes. Results: the median inclusion rate was 48.5% (38.9-84.5%). At 12 months the median attrition rate was 10.4% (3.9-12.3%, n = 10) or with the inclusion of mortality 16.2% (9.5-17.1%, n = 11). Adherence was high for exercise that was individually targeted (e.g. 89% physical therapy) and group based (72-88%) and for medication interventions (68-88%). For multifactorial interventions, adherence ranged from 11% for attending 60+/88 of exercise classes to 93% for use/repairs of aids. Adherence as a moderator of treatment effectiveness was tested in nursing care facilities (n = 6) and positively identified in three studies for medication and multifactorial interventions. Conclusions: using median rates for recruitment (50%), attrition (15%) and adherence (80%), by 12 months, it is estimated that on average only a third of nursing care facility residents are likely to be adhering to falls prevention interventions. © The Author 2011. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Geriatrics Society.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Nyman, S.R. and Victor, C.R.

Journal: AGE AND AGEING

Volume: 40

Issue: 4

Pages: 430-436

ISSN: 0002-0729

DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afr016

This data was imported from Europe PubMed Central:

Authors: Nyman, S.R. and Victor, C.R.

Journal: Age and ageing

Volume: 40

Issue: 4

Pages: 430-436

eISSN: 1468-2834

ISSN: 0002-0729

BACKGROUND: randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of falls prevention conducted in institutional settings have recently been systematically reviewed. OBJECTIVE: to supplement this review by analysing older people's participation in the trials and engagement with the interventions. DESIGN: review of the 41 RCTs included in the Cochrane systematic review of falls prevention interventions. SETTING: hospitals and nursing care facilities. PARTICIPANTS: adults aged/mean age of 65+. METHODS: calculated aggregate data on recruitment (inclusion into the trial), attrition at 12-month follow-up (loss of participants from the trial), adherence (to intervention protocol), and whether adherence moderated the effect of interventions on trial outcomes. RESULTS: the median inclusion rate was 48.5% (38.9-84.5%). At 12 months the median attrition rate was 10.4% (3.9-12.3%, n = 10) or with the inclusion of mortality 16.2% (9.5-17.1%, n = 11). Adherence was high for exercise that was individually targeted (e.g. 89% physical therapy) and group based (72-88%) and for medication interventions (68-88%). For multifactorial interventions, adherence ranged from 11% for attending 60+/88 of exercise classes to 93% for use/repairs of aids. Adherence as a moderator of treatment effectiveness was tested in nursing care facilities (n = 6) and positively identified in three studies for medication and multifactorial interventions. CONCLUSIONS: using median rates for recruitment (50%), attrition (15%) and adherence (80%), by 12 months, it is estimated that on average only a third of nursing care facility residents are likely to be adhering to falls prevention interventions.

The data on this page was last updated at 04:40 on November 19, 2017.