Human Evolution Out of Africa: The Role of Refugia and Climate Change

This source preferred by John Stewart

Authors: Stewart, J.R. and Stringer, C.B.

Journal: Science

Volume: 335

Pages: 1317-1321

DOI: 10.1126/science.1215627

Although an African origin of the modern human species is generally accepted, the evolutionary processes involved in the speciation, geographical spread, and eventual extinction of archaic humans outside of Africa are much debated. An additional complexity has been the recent evidence of limited interbreeding between modern humans and the Neandertals and Denisovans. Modern human migrations and interactions began during the buildup to the Last Glacial Maximum, starting about 100,000 years ago. By examining the history of other organisms through glacial cycles, valuable models for evolutionary biogeography can be formulated. According to one such model, the adoption of a new refugium by a subgroup of a species may lead to important evolutionary changes.

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Stewart, J.R. and Stringer, C.B.

Journal: Science

Volume: 335

Issue: 6074

Pages: 1317-1321

eISSN: 1095-9203

DOI: 10.1126/science.1215627

Although an African origin of the modern human species is generally accepted, the evolutionary processes involved in the speciation, geographical spread, and eventual extinction of archaic humans outside of Africa are much debated. An additional complexity has been the recent evidence of limited interbreeding between modern humans and the Neandertals and Denisovans. Modern human migrations and interactions began during the buildup to the Last Glacial Maximum, starting about 100,000 years ago. By examining the history of other organisms through glacial cycles, valuable models for evolutionary biogeography can be formulated. According to one such model, the adoption of a new refugium by a subgroup of a species may lead to important evolutionary changes.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Stewart, J.R. and Stringer, C.B.

Journal: Science

Volume: 335

Issue: 6074

Pages: 1317-1321

eISSN: 1095-9203

ISSN: 0036-8075

DOI: 10.1126/science.1215627

Although an African origin of the modern human species is generally accepted, the evolutionary processes involved in the speciation, geographical spread, and eventual extinction of archaic humans outside of Africa are much debated. An additional complexity has been the recent evidence of limited interbreeding between modern humans and the Neandertals and Denisovans. Modern human migrations and interactions began during the buildup to the Last Glacial Maximum, starting about 100,000 years ago. By examining the history of other organisms through glacial cycles, valuable models for evolutionary biogeography can be formulated. According to one such model, the adoption of a new refugium by a subgroup of a species may lead to important evolutionary changes.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Stewart, J.R. and Stringer, C.B.

Journal: SCIENCE

Volume: 335

Issue: 6074

Pages: 1317-1321

ISSN: 0036-8075

DOI: 10.1126/science.1215627

This data was imported from Europe PubMed Central:

Authors: Stewart, J.R. and Stringer, C.B.

Journal: Science (New York, N.Y.)

Volume: 335

Issue: 6074

Pages: 1317-1321

eISSN: 1095-9203

ISSN: 0036-8075

Although an African origin of the modern human species is generally accepted, the evolutionary processes involved in the speciation, geographical spread, and eventual extinction of archaic humans outside of Africa are much debated. An additional complexity has been the recent evidence of limited interbreeding between modern humans and the Neandertals and Denisovans. Modern human migrations and interactions began during the buildup to the Last Glacial Maximum, starting about 100,000 years ago. By examining the history of other organisms through glacial cycles, valuable models for evolutionary biogeography can be formulated. According to one such model, the adoption of a new refugium by a subgroup of a species may lead to important evolutionary changes.

The data on this page was last updated at 04:45 on December 14, 2017.