Keeping informed during times of economic downturn: the trusted amateur as a preferred source of financial information

This source preferred by Stella Fearnley, Lee-Ann Fenge and Sarah Hean

Authors: Hean, S., Fenge, L.-A., Worswick, L., Wilkinson, C. and Fearnley, S.

Journal: Public Money and Management

ISSN: 0954-0962

Service providers need to understand financial capability from the perspective of the older client, in order to tailor services best suited for this age group. This paper explores how older people perceive one dimension of their financial capability, namely their ability to stay financially informed. Interviews (n=28) with older people showed older people to be accessing less traditional sources of financial information: they are either self-reliant for information, researching on the internet or using the media, or they tap into existing sources of social capital found within their social networks. Trusted public and voluntary sector service providers are preferred information resources over and above professionals in financial services. These findings suggest financial services need to build their trustworthiness in the eyes of their older clients and or form partnerships with other trusted voluntary or public sector services.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Hean, S., Worswick, L., Fenge, L.A., Wilkinson, C. and Fearnley, S.

Journal: Public Money and Management

Volume: 33

Issue: 1

Pages: 23-30

eISSN: 1467-9302

ISSN: 0954-0962

DOI: 10.1080/09540962.2013.744891

Service providers need to understand financial capability from the perspective of the older client, in order to deliver services best suited for this age group. This article explores how older people perceive one dimension of their financial capability-their ability to stay financially informed. Older people were found to be accessing less traditional sources of financial information: they are either selfreliant for information, researching on the internet or using the media, or they tap into existing sources of social capital found within their social networks. Trusted public and voluntary sector service providers are preferred information resources over and above professionals in financial services. These findings suggest financial services need to build trust and/or form partnerships with other trusted voluntary or public sector services. © 2013 Copyright CIPFA.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Hean, S., Worswick, L., Fenge, L., Wilkinson, C. and Fearnley, S.

Journal: PUBLIC MONEY & MANAGEMENT

Volume: 33

Issue: 1

Pages: 23-30

ISSN: 0954-0962

DOI: 10.1080/09540962.2013.744891

The data on this page was last updated at 04:46 on November 24, 2017.