Neuromuscular responses to mild-muscle damaging eccentric exercise in a low glycogen state.

This source preferred by James Gavin

Authors: Gavin, J.P., Myers, S.D. and Willems, M.E.T.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/21609/

http://www.elsevier.com/

Journal: Journal of Electromyography and Kinesiology

Volume: 25

Issue: 1

Pages: 53-60

Publisher: Elsevier

DOI: 10.1016/j.jelekin.2014.10.005

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Gavin, J.P., Myers, S.D. and Willems, M.E.T.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/21609/

Journal: J Electromyogr Kinesiol

Volume: 25

Issue: 1

Pages: 53-60

eISSN: 1873-5711

DOI: 10.1016/j.jelekin.2014.10.005

The aim of this study was to examine the effect of low muscle glycogen on the neuromuscular responses to maximal eccentric contractions. Fourteen healthy men (22 ± 3 years) performed single-leg cycling (20 min at ~75% maximal oxygen uptake (V̇O2 max); eight 90 s sprints at a 1:1 work-to-rest ratio (5% decrements from 90% to 55% V̇O2 max until exhaustion) the evening before 100 eccentric (1.57 rads(-1)) with reduced (RED) and normal glycogen (NORM). Neuromuscular responses were measured during and up to 48 h after with maximal voluntary and involuntary (twitch, 20 Hz and 50 Hz) isometric contractions. During eccentric contractions, peak torque decreased (RED: -16.1 ± 2.5%; NORM: -6.2 ± 5.1%) and EMG frequency increased according to muscle length. EMG activity decreased for RED only. After eccentric contractions, maximal isometric force was reduced up to 24h for NORM (-13.5 ± 5.8%) and 48 h for RED (-7.4 ± 10.9%). Twelve hours after eccentric contractions, twitch force and the 20:50 Hz ratio were decreased for RED but not for NORM. Immediate involuntary with prolonged voluntary force loss suggests that reduced glycogen is associated with increased susceptibility to mild muscle-damaging eccentric exercise with contributions of peripheral and central mechanisms to be different during recovery.

This data was imported from Europe PubMed Central:

Authors: Gavin, J.P., Myers, S.D. and Willems, M.E.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/21609/

Journal: Journal of electromyography and kinesiology : official journal of the International Society of Electrophysiological Kinesiology

Volume: 25

Issue: 1

Pages: 53-60

eISSN: 1873-5711

ISSN: 1050-6411

The aim of this study was to examine the effect of low muscle glycogen on the neuromuscular responses to maximal eccentric contractions. Fourteen healthy men (22 ± 3 years) performed single-leg cycling (20 min at ~75% maximal oxygen uptake (V̇O2 max); eight 90 s sprints at a 1:1 work-to-rest ratio (5% decrements from 90% to 55% V̇O2 max until exhaustion) the evening before 100 eccentric (1.57 rads(-1)) with reduced (RED) and normal glycogen (NORM). Neuromuscular responses were measured during and up to 48 h after with maximal voluntary and involuntary (twitch, 20 Hz and 50 Hz) isometric contractions. During eccentric contractions, peak torque decreased (RED: -16.1 ± 2.5%; NORM: -6.2 ± 5.1%) and EMG frequency increased according to muscle length. EMG activity decreased for RED only. After eccentric contractions, maximal isometric force was reduced up to 24h for NORM (-13.5 ± 5.8%) and 48 h for RED (-7.4 ± 10.9%). Twelve hours after eccentric contractions, twitch force and the 20:50 Hz ratio were decreased for RED but not for NORM. Immediate involuntary with prolonged voluntary force loss suggests that reduced glycogen is associated with increased susceptibility to mild muscle-damaging eccentric exercise with contributions of peripheral and central mechanisms to be different during recovery.

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