Characteristics of an accident and emergency liaison mental health service in East London

This source preferred by Sarah Eales

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Callaghan, P., Eales, S., Leigh, L., Smith, A. and Nichols, J.

Journal: J Adv Nurs

Volume: 35

Issue: 6

Pages: 812-818

ISSN: 0309-2402

AIM OF THE STUDY: To analyse the work of a liaison mental health service at the Accident and Emergency (A & E) department of a hospital in East London. BACKGROUND: The English National Service Frameworks (NSF) for Mental Health recommend that A & E departments provide liaison mental health services and this study reports how a service in East London is responding to this challenge. RESEARCH METHODS: Data were collected during a 14-month period using a specially designed audit form. RESULTS: The typical referral was aged 36, of either sex, United Kingdom (UK) non-White with a diagnosis of depression. The majority of referrals were in the afternoon and seen immediately. A slight majority were known to mental health services; many were new referrals. Older and male clients were more likely, and Bengali and other Asian clients were less likely, to be registered with a psychiatrist. There were seasonal variations in referral type. Emergency referrals tended to have a diagnosis of schizophrenia; urgent and non-urgent referrals were more likely to be depressed. The outcome for the majority of referrals was referral to appropriate community services. The majority of non-clinical referrals were for advice, information and support. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSIONS: The service seems a useful resource for A & E staff, and clients with mental health problems. The service is a channel through which people access mental health services and appears to address the NSF for Mental Health.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Callaghan, P., Eales, S., Leigh, L., Smith, A. and Nichols, J.

Journal: Journal of Advanced Nursing

Volume: 35

Issue: 6

Pages: 812-818

ISSN: 0309-2402

DOI: 10.1046/j.1365-2648.2001.01919.x

Aim of the study. To analyse the work of a liaison mental health service at the Accident and Emergency (A & E) department of a hospital in East London. Background. The English National Service Frameworks (NSF) for Mental Health recommend that A & E departments provide liaison mental health services and this study reports how a service in East London is responding to this challenge. Research methods. Data were collected during a 14-month period using a specially designed audit form. Results. The typical referral was aged 36, of either sex, United Kingdom (UK) non-White with a diagnosis of depression. The majority of referrals were in the afternoon and seen immediately. A slight majority were known to mental health services; many were new referrals. Older and male clients were more likely, and Bengali and other Asian clients were less likely, to be registered with a psychiatrist. There were seasonal variations in referral type. Emergency referrals tended to have a diagnosis of schizophrenia; urgent and non-urgent referrals were more likely to be depressed. The outcome for the majority of referrals was referral to appropriate community services. The majority of non-clinical referrals were for advice, information and support. Discussion and conclusions. The service seems a useful resource for A & E staff, and clients with mental health problems. The service is a channel through which people access mental health services and appears to address the NSF for Mental Health.

This data was imported from Europe PubMed Central:

Authors: Callaghan, P., Eales, S., Leigh, L., Smith, A. and Nichols, J.

Journal: Journal of advanced nursing

Volume: 35

Issue: 6

Pages: 812-818

eISSN: 1365-2648

ISSN: 0309-2402

AIM OF THE STUDY: To analyse the work of a liaison mental health service at the Accident and Emergency (A & E) department of a hospital in East London. BACKGROUND: The English National Service Frameworks (NSF) for Mental Health recommend that A & E departments provide liaison mental health services and this study reports how a service in East London is responding to this challenge. RESEARCH METHODS: Data were collected during a 14-month period using a specially designed audit form. RESULTS: The typical referral was aged 36, of either sex, United Kingdom (UK) non-White with a diagnosis of depression. The majority of referrals were in the afternoon and seen immediately. A slight majority were known to mental health services; many were new referrals. Older and male clients were more likely, and Bengali and other Asian clients were less likely, to be registered with a psychiatrist. There were seasonal variations in referral type. Emergency referrals tended to have a diagnosis of schizophrenia; urgent and non-urgent referrals were more likely to be depressed. The outcome for the majority of referrals was referral to appropriate community services. The majority of non-clinical referrals were for advice, information and support. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSIONS: The service seems a useful resource for A & E staff, and clients with mental health problems. The service is a channel through which people access mental health services and appears to address the NSF for Mental Health.

The data on this page was last updated at 04:57 on December 15, 2017.