Blogging while Black, British and female: a critical study on discursive activism

Authors: Gabriel, D.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/23221/

http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/rics20#.VqD9W5qLSUk

Journal: Information, Communication and Society

Volume: 20

Publisher: Taylor Francis

ISSN: 1468-4462

This study explores Black British women’s motivations for divulging racial and ethnic identity in the blogosphere (sometimes referred to as ‘blogging while Black’) and their use of blogs for discursive activism. Previous research on Black women in the blogosphere examines how Black women appropriate blogs as a medium for empowerment (Somolu, 2007), as a platform for feminist resistance to raced and gendered discrimination (Steele, 2012) and as a medium for feminist resistance rooted in the experiences and perspectives of the hip hop generation (Boylorn, 2013). The blogosphere is often perceived as a racially neutral space where shared interests across geographical and temporal boundaries limit the significance of racial and ethnic identity. However, the constructed narratives of Black British women in this study highlight their experiences of subtle forms of prejudice and discrimination perpetuated through dominant discourses in the mainstream media. The findings demonstrate how they use blogs as a medium for discursive activism to challenge stereotypical raced and gendered representation in the mainstream media. Much of the research on the blogosphere in Britain reflects its use by the White majority population. This study therefore extends understanding of the blogosphere through the counter narratives of Black British women while highlighting alternative modes of political communication.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Gabriel, D.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/23221/

Journal: Information Communication and Society

Volume: 19

Issue: 11

Pages: 1622-1635

eISSN: 1468-4462

ISSN: 1369-118X

DOI: 10.1080/1369118X.2016.1146784

© 2016 Taylor & Francis. ABSTRACT: This study explores Black British women's motivations for divulging racial and ethnic identity in the blogosphere (sometimes referred to as blogging while Black) and their use of blogs for discursive activism. It builds on previous research that gives voice to Black womens marginalized experiences through powerful counter narratives. The blogosphere is often perceived as a racially neutral space where shared interests across geographical and temporal boundaries limit the significance of racial and ethnic identity. However, the constructed narratives of Black British women in this study highlight their experiences of subtle forms of prejudice and discrimination perpetuated through dominant discourses in the mainstream media. The findings demonstrate how they use blogs as a medium for discursive activism to challenge stereotypical raced and gendered representation in the mainstream media. Much of the research on the blogosphere in Britain reflects its use by the White majority population. This study therefore extends understanding of the blogosphere and highlights alternative modes of political communication.

This source preferred by Deborah Gabriel

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Gabriel, D.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/23221/

Journal: INFORMATION COMMUNICATION & SOCIETY

Volume: 19

Issue: 11

Pages: 1622-1635

eISSN: 1468-4462

ISSN: 1369-118X

DOI: 10.1080/1369118X.2016.1146784

The data on this page was last updated at 04:40 on August 22, 2017.