Feeding reduces waterborne Cu bioaccumulation in a marine rabbitfish Siganus oramin

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Guo, Z., Zhang, W., Du, S., Zhou, Y., Gao, N., Zhang, L. and Green, I.

Journal: Environ Pollut

Volume: 208

Issue: Pt B

Pages: 580-589

eISSN: 1873-6424

DOI: 10.1016/j.envpol.2015.10.032

Waterborne metal uptake has been extensively studied and dietary metal assimilation is increasingly recognized in fish, whilst the interaction between the two uptake routes is largely overlooked. This study compared the waterborne Cu bioaccumulation ((65)Cu as tracer) in a juvenile rabbitfish at different feeding regimes (starvation (SG), feeding normal diet (NDG) or diet supplemented with extra Cu (DCG)) to test the hypothesis that feeding can influence waterborne metal uptake in marine fish. NDG and DCG diet was fed as a single meal and then all fish were exposed to waterborne (65)Cu for 48 h, during which the time course sampling was conducted to determine (65)Cu bioaccumulation, chyme flow and dietary Cu assimilation. The results revealed that SG fish accumulated the highest (65)Cu, followed by NDG (61% of SG), whilst DCG fish accumulated the lowest (65)Cu (34% of SG). These results suggested a protective effect of feeding against waterborne Cu bioaccumulation. This effect was most notable between 10 min and 16 h when there was chyme in gastrointestinal tract (GT). Dietary Cu assimilation mainly occurred before 16 h after feeding. Waterborne (65)Cu influx rate in the GT was positively correlated with (65)Cu contents of chyme in NDG, whereas it was largely negatively correlated with (65)Cu contents of chyme in DCG. The waterborne Cu uptake in the GT was mainly influenced by the chyme flow and dietary Cu assimilation. Overall, our findings suggested that feeding has an important effect on waterborne metal uptake and that both the feeding status of the fish and the relative metal exposure through water and food should be considered in prediction of the metal bioaccumulation and biomonitoring programs.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Guo, Z., Zhang, W., Du, S., Zhou, Y., Gao, N., Zhang, L. and Green, I.

Journal: Environmental Pollution

Volume: 208

Pages: 580-589

eISSN: 1873-6424

ISSN: 0269-7491

DOI: 10.1016/j.envpol.2015.10.032

© 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. Waterborne metal uptake has been extensively studied and dietary metal assimilation is increasingly recognized in fish, whilst the interaction between the two uptake routes is largely overlooked. This study compared the waterborne Cu bioaccumulation ( 65 Cu as tracer) in a juvenile rabbitfish at different feeding regimes (starvation (SG), feeding normal diet (NDG) or diet supplemented with extra Cu (DCG)) to test the hypothesis that feeding can influence waterborne metal uptake in marine fish. NDG and DCG diet was fed as a single meal and then all fish were exposed to waterborne 65 Cu for 48 h, during which the time course sampling was conducted to determine 65 Cu bioaccumulation, chyme flow and dietary Cu assimilation. The results revealed that SG fish accumulated the highest 65 Cu, followed by NDG (61% of SG), whilst DCG fish accumulated the lowest 65 Cu (34% of SG). These results suggested a protective effect of feeding against waterborne Cu bioaccumulation. This effect was most notable between 10 min and 16 h when there was chyme in gastrointestinal tract (GT). Dietary Cu assimilation mainly occurred before 16 h after feeding. Waterborne 65 Cu influx rate in the GT was positively correlated with 65 Cu contents of chyme in NDG, whereas it was largely negatively correlated with 65 Cu contents of chyme in DCG. The waterborne Cu uptake in the GT was mainly influenced by the chyme flow and dietary Cu assimilation. Overall, our findings suggested that feeding has an important effect on waterborne metal uptake and that both the feeding status of the fish and the relative metal exposure through water and food should be considered in prediction of the metal bioaccumulation and biomonitoring programs.

This source preferred by Iain Green

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Guo, Z., Zhang, W., Du, S., Zhou, Y., Gao, N., Zhang, L. and Green, I.

Journal: ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTION

Volume: 208

Pages: 580-589

eISSN: 1873-6424

ISSN: 0269-7491

DOI: 10.1016/j.envpol.2015.10.032

This data was imported from Europe PubMed Central:

Authors: Guo, Z., Zhang, W., Du, S., Zhou, Y., Gao, N., Zhang, L. and Green, I.

Journal: Environmental pollution (Barking, Essex : 1987)

Volume: 208

Issue: Pt B

Pages: 580-589

eISSN: 1873-6424

ISSN: 0269-7491

Waterborne metal uptake has been extensively studied and dietary metal assimilation is increasingly recognized in fish, whilst the interaction between the two uptake routes is largely overlooked. This study compared the waterborne Cu bioaccumulation ((65)Cu as tracer) in a juvenile rabbitfish at different feeding regimes (starvation (SG), feeding normal diet (NDG) or diet supplemented with extra Cu (DCG)) to test the hypothesis that feeding can influence waterborne metal uptake in marine fish. NDG and DCG diet was fed as a single meal and then all fish were exposed to waterborne (65)Cu for 48 h, during which the time course sampling was conducted to determine (65)Cu bioaccumulation, chyme flow and dietary Cu assimilation. The results revealed that SG fish accumulated the highest (65)Cu, followed by NDG (61% of SG), whilst DCG fish accumulated the lowest (65)Cu (34% of SG). These results suggested a protective effect of feeding against waterborne Cu bioaccumulation. This effect was most notable between 10 min and 16 h when there was chyme in gastrointestinal tract (GT). Dietary Cu assimilation mainly occurred before 16 h after feeding. Waterborne (65)Cu influx rate in the GT was positively correlated with (65)Cu contents of chyme in NDG, whereas it was largely negatively correlated with (65)Cu contents of chyme in DCG. The waterborne Cu uptake in the GT was mainly influenced by the chyme flow and dietary Cu assimilation. Overall, our findings suggested that feeding has an important effect on waterborne metal uptake and that both the feeding status of the fish and the relative metal exposure through water and food should be considered in prediction of the metal bioaccumulation and biomonitoring programs.

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