Structural attributes of individual trees for identifying homogeneous patches in a tropical rainforest

Authors: Alexander, C., Korstjens, A.H. and Hill, R.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/24954/

Journal: International Journal of Applied Earth Observation and Geoinformation

Volume: 55

Pages: 68-72

ISSN: 1872-826X

DOI: 10.1016/j.jag.2016.11.004

Mapping and monitoring tropical rainforests and quantifying their carbon stocks are important, bothfor devising strategies for their conservation and mitigating the effects of climate change. AirborneLaser Scanning (ALS) has advantages over other remote sensing techniques for describing the three-dimensional structure of forests. This study identifies forest patches using ALS-based structural attributesin a tropical rainforest in Sumatra, Indonesia. A method to group trees with similar attributes into forestpatches based on Thiessen polygons and k-medoids clustering is developed, combining the advantagesof both raster and individual tree–based methods. The structural composition of the patches could be anindicator of habitat type and quality. The patches could also be a basis for developing allometric modelsfor more accurate estimation of carbon stock than is currently possible with generalised models.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Alexander, C., Korstjens, A.H. and Hill, R.A.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/24954/

Journal: International Journal of Applied Earth Observation and Geoinformation

Volume: 55

Pages: 68-72

eISSN: 1872-826X

ISSN: 1569-8432

DOI: 10.1016/j.jag.2016.11.004

© 2016 Elsevier B.V. Mapping and monitoring tropical rainforests and quantifying their carbon stocks are important, both for devising strategies for their conservation and mitigating the effects of climate change. Airborne Laser Scanning (ALS) has advantages over other remote sensing techniques for describing the three-dimensional structure of forests. This study identifies forest patches using ALS-based structural attributes in a tropical rainforest in Sumatra, Indonesia. A method to group trees with similar attributes into forest patches based on Thiessen polygons and k-medoids clustering is developed, combining the advantages of both raster and individual tree–based methods. The structural composition of the patches could be an indicator of habitat type and quality. The patches could also be a basis for developing allometric models for more accurate estimation of carbon stock than is currently possible with generalised models.

This source preferred by Ross Hill and Amanda Korstjens

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Alexander, C., Korstjens, A.H. and Hill, R.A.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/24954/

Journal: International Journal of Applied Earth Observation and Geoinformation

Volume: 55

Pages: 68-72

ISSN: 0303-2434

DOI: 10.1016/j.jag.2016.11.004

The data on this page was last updated at 04:42 on November 25, 2017.