Exploring the predation of UK bumblebees (Apidae, Bombus spp.) by the invasive pitcher plant Sarracenia purpurea: examining the effects of annual variation, seasonal variation, plant density and bumblebee gender

Authors: Franklin, E., Diaz, A., Evans, D., Thornton, A. and Moody, C.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/25001/

Journal: Arthropod-Plant Interactions

Publisher: Springer Verlag (Germany)

ISSN: 1872-8855

Invasive carnivorous plant species can impact the native invertebrate communities on which they prey. This article explores the predation of native UK bumblebees (Bombus spp.) by the invasive pitcher plant species Sarracenia purpurea and discusses the potential effect of S. purpurea on native bumblebees. Specifically, it evaluates whether the extent to which bumblebees are captured varies (i) over successive years, (ii) across June and July, (iii) with density of distribution of pitchers or (iv) with bumblebee gender. Pitcher contents were examined from an established population of Sarracenia purpurea growing in Dorset, UK. Results show that the total extent to which bumblebees were captured differed over the years 2012–2014 inclusive. A 1-year study in 2013 showed that more bumblebees were caught in July than in June and more bumblebees were captured when pitchers grew at high density. Results from 2013 also showed that more pitchers caught more than one bumblebee than would be expected based on a normal probability distribution and that this phenomenon affects female and male bumblebees equally. We discuss possible reasons for these results including that the bumblebees may be using S. purpurea as a resource. Further work is required to establish the exact underpinning mechanisms and the relative roles of plant and bumblebee behaviour within the relationship. Such interaction complexity may have consequences for consideration in invasive carnivorous plant management.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Franklin, E., Evans, D., Thornton, A., Moody, C., Green, I. and Diaz, A.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/25001/

Journal: Arthropod-Plant Interactions

Volume: 11

Issue: 1

Pages: 79-88

eISSN: 1872-8847

ISSN: 1872-8855

DOI: 10.1007/s11829-016-9468-2

© 2016, The Author(s). Invasive carnivorous plant species can impact the native invertebrate communities on which they prey. This article explores the predation of native UK bumblebees (Bombus spp.) by the invasive pitcher plant species Sarracenia purpurea and discusses the potential effect of S. purpurea on native bumblebees. Specifically, it evaluates whether the extent to which bumblebees are captured varies (i) over successive years, (ii) across June and July, (iii) with density of distribution of pitchers or (iv) with bumblebee gender. Pitcher contents were examined from an established population of Sarracenia purpurea growing in Dorset, UK. Results show that the total extent to which bumblebees were captured differed over the years 2012–2014 inclusive. A 1-year study in 2013 showed that more bumblebees were caught in July than in June and more bumblebees were captured when pitchers grew at high density. Results from 2013 also showed that more pitchers caught more than one bumblebee than would be expected based on a normal probability distribution and that this phenomenon affects female and male bumblebees equally. We discuss possible reasons for these results including that the bumblebees may be using S. purpurea as a resource. Further work is required to establish the exact underpinning mechanisms and the relative roles of plant and bumblebee behaviour within the relationship. Such interaction complexity may have consequences for consideration in invasive carnivorous plant management.

This source preferred by Anita Diaz, Ann Thornton, Damian Evans and Iain Green

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Franklin, E., Evans, D., Thornton, A., Moody, C., Green, I. and Diaz, A.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/25001/

Journal: ARTHROPOD-PLANT INTERACTIONS

Volume: 11

Issue: 1

Pages: 79-88

eISSN: 1872-8847

ISSN: 1872-8855

DOI: 10.1007/s11829-016-9468-2

The data on this page was last updated at 04:46 on November 24, 2017.