Examining the capacity of a sport for development programme to create social capital

Authors: Adams, A., Harris, K. and Lindsey, I.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/29388/

Journal: Sport in Society

Publisher: Routledge

DOI: 10.1080/17430437.2017.1346627.

Robert Putnam’s conceptualisation of social capital has been commonly associated with, and used to analyse, sport-for-development programmes. This paper bucks this trend and uses James Coleman’s rational strain of social capital to examine the use of sport as a component part of a programme to support male adults in addressing connected problems of substance misuse, homelessness and other forms of social exclusion. Using a qualitative research strategy, in-depth and longitudinal data were collected using individual interviews and focus groups with programme participants and key stakeholders over a three-year period. The results suggest the importance of unintentionality for the formation and use value of social capital; indicating that social capital created through this programme was individual, contingent on interactional context and benefitted individuals in line with Coleman’s six aspects of social capital.

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Authors: Adams, A., Harris, K. and Lindsey, I.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/29388/

Journal: Sport in Society

Pages: 1-16

ISSN: 1743-0437

DOI: 10.1080/17430437.2017.1346627

© 2017 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group Robert Putnam’s conceptualization of social capital has been commonly associated with, and used to analyse, sport-for-development programmes. This paper bucks this trend and uses James Coleman’s rational strain of social capital to examine the use of sport as a component part of a programme to support male adults in addressing connected problems of substance misuse, homelessness and other forms of social exclusion. Using a qualitative research strategy, in-depth and longitudinal data were collected using individual interviews and focus groups with programme participants and key stakeholders over a three-year period. The results suggest the importance of unintentionality for the formation and use value of social capital; indicating that social capital created through this programme was individual, contingent on interactional context and benefited individuals in line with Coleman’s six aspects of social capital.

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