Identifying Bird Remains Using Ancient DNA Barcoding

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Dalén, L., Lagerholm, V.K., Nylander, J.A.A., Barton, N., Bochenski, Z.M., Tomek, T., Rudling, D., Ericson, P.G.P., Irestedt, M. and Stewart, J.R.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/29458/

Journal: Genes (Basel)

Volume: 8

Issue: 6

ISSN: 2073-4425

DOI: 10.3390/genes8060169

Bird remains that are difficult to identify taxonomically using morphological methods, are common in the palaeontological record. Other types of challenging avian material include artefacts and food items from endangered taxa, as well as remains from aircraft strikes. We here present a DNA-based method that enables taxonomic identification of bird remains, even from material where the DNA is heavily degraded. The method is based on the amplification and sequencing of two short variable parts of the 16S region in the mitochondrial genome. To demonstrate the applicability of this approach, we evaluated the method on a set of Holocene and Late Pleistocene postcranial bird bones from several palaeontological and archaeological sites in Europe with good success.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Dalén, L., Lagerholm, V.K., Nylander, J.A.A., Barton, N., Bochenski, Z.M., Tomek, T., Rudling, D., Ericson, P.G.P., Irestedt, M. and Stewart, J.R.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/29458/

Journal: Genes

Volume: 8

Issue: 6

eISSN: 2073-4425

DOI: 10.3390/genes8060169

© 2017 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. Bird remains that are difficult to identify taxonomically using morphological methods, are common in the palaeontological record. Other types of challenging avian material include artefacts and food items from endangered taxa, as well as remains from aircraft strikes. We here present a DNA-based method that enables taxonomic identification of bird remains, even from material where the DNA is heavily degraded. The method is based on the amplification and sequencing of two short variable parts of the 16S region in the mitochondrial genome. To demonstrate the applicability of this approach, we evaluated the method on a set of Holocene and Late Pleistocene postcranial bird bones from several palaeontological and archaeological sites in Europe with good success.

This source preferred by John Stewart

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Dalen, L., Lagerholm, V.K., Nylander, J.A.A., Barton, N., Bochenski, Z.M., Tomek, T., Rudling, D., Ericson, P.G.P., Irestedt, M. and Stewart, J.R.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/29458/

Journal: GENES

Volume: 8

Issue: 6

ISSN: 2073-4425

DOI: 10.3390/genes8060169

The data on this page was last updated at 04:57 on December 15, 2017.