An interactive editor for curve-skeletons: SkeletonLab

Authors: Barbieri, S., Meloni, P., Usai, F., Spano, L.D. and Scateni, R.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/29462/

Journal: Computers & graphics

Volume: 60

Issue: November 2016

Pages: 23-33

Publisher: Pergamon Press Ltd.

ISSN: 0097-8493

DOI: 10.1016/j.cag.2016.08.002

Curve-skeletons are powerful shape descriptors able to provide higher level information on topology, structure and semantics of a given digital object. Their range of application is wide and encompasses computer animation, shape matching, modelling and remeshing. While a universally accepted definition of curve-skeleton is still lacking, there are currently many algorithms for the curve-skeleton computation (or skeletonization) as well as different techniques for building a mesh around a given curve-skeleton (inverse skeletonization). Despite their widespread use, automatically extracted skeletons usually need to be processed in order to be used in further stages of any pipeline, due to different requirements. We present here an advanced tool, named SkeletonLab, that provides simple interactive techniques to rapidly and automatically edit and repair curve skeletons generated using different techniques proposed in the literature, as well as handcrafting them. The aim of the tool is to allow trained practitioners to manipulate the curve-skeletons obtained with skeletonization algorithms in order to fit their specific pipelines or to explore the requirements of newly developed techniques.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Barbieri, S., Meloni, P., Usai, F., Spano, L.D. and Scateni, R.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/29462/

Journal: Computers and Graphics (Pergamon)

Volume: 60

Pages: 23-33

ISSN: 0097-8493

DOI: 10.1016/j.cag.2016.08.002

© 2016 Elsevier Ltd Curve-skeletons are powerful shape descriptors able to provide higher level information on topology, structure and semantics of a given digital object. Their range of application is wide and encompasses computer animation, shape matching, modelling and remeshing. While a universally accepted definition of curve-skeleton is still lacking, there are currently many algorithms for the curve-skeleton computation (or skeletonization) as well as different techniques for building a mesh around a given curve-skeleton (inverse skeletonization). Despite their widespread use, automatically extracted skeletons usually need to be processed in order to be used in further stages of any pipeline, due to different requirements. We present here an advanced tool, named SkeletonLab, that provides simple interactive techniques to rapidly and automatically edit and repair curve skeletons generated using different techniques proposed in the literature, as well as handcrafting them. The aim of the tool is to allow trained practitioners to manipulate the curve-skeletons obtained with skeletonization algorithms in order to fit their specific pipelines or to explore the requirements of newly developed techniques.

This source preferred by Simone Barbieri

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Barbieri, S., Meloni, P., Usai, F., Spano, L.D. and Scateni, R.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/29462/

Journal: COMPUTERS & GRAPHICS-UK

Volume: 60

Pages: 23-33

eISSN: 1873-7684

ISSN: 0097-8493

DOI: 10.1016/j.cag.2016.08.002

The data on this page was last updated at 04:38 on September 19, 2017.