Consumption of a High Quantity and a Wide Variety of Vegetables Are Predicted by Different Food Choice Motives in Older Adults from France, Italy and the UK

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Appleton, K.M., Dinnella, C., Spinelli, S., Morizet, D., Saulais, L., Hemingway, A., Monteleone, E., Depezay, L., Perez-Cueto, F.J.A. and Hartwell, H.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/29693/

Journal: Nutrients

Volume: 9

Issue: 9

eISSN: 2072-6643

DOI: 10.3390/nu9090923

BACKGROUND: Consumption of a high quantity and wide variety of vegetables is currently recommended for health. Dietary variety can be low, however, particularly for older adults. This study investigated the affective factors associated with the quantity and variety of vegetables consumed by older adults in France, Italy and the UK. METHODS: Adults aged 65 years plus completed questionnaires on self-reported vegetable intake (quantity and variety), liking for vegetables, attitudes towards intake, and demographic variables. RESULTS: In 497 older adults (France, n = 187, Italy, n = 152, UK, n = 158), higher quantities of vegetables consumed were associated with a higher age, affluence score and liking for vegetables, and a lower importance in consumption of familiarity (smallest β = 0.11, p = 0.03). Greater variety was associated with a higher liking and importance of health benefits, and a lower importance of familiarity (smallest β = -0.11, p < 0.01). Higher quantity and variety combined (quantity × variety) was associated with a higher age, liking and importance of health benefits, and a lower importance of familiarity (smallest β = 0.14, p = 0.02). Country-specific effects were also found (smallest β = 0.20, p < 0.01). CONCLUSIONS: These findings demonstrate a role for liking and a lower concern for eating familiar foods in vegetable consumption, and a particular role for concern for health benefits in the consumption of a greater variety of vegetables.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Appleton, K.M., Dinnella, C., Spinelli, S., Morizet, D., Saulais, L., Hemingway, A., Monteleone, E., Depezay, L., Perez-Cueto, F.J.A. and Hartwell, H.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/29693/

Journal: Nutrients

Volume: 9

Issue: 9

eISSN: 2072-6643

DOI: 10.3390/nu9090923

© 2017 by the authors. Background: Consumption of a high quantity and wide variety of vegetables is currently recommended for health. Dietary variety can be low, however, particularly for older adults. This study investigated the affective factors associated with the quantity and variety of vegetables consumed by older adults in France, Italy and the UK. Methods: Adults aged 65 years plus completed questionnaires on self-reported vegetable intake (quantity and variety), liking for vegetables, attitudes towards intake, and demographic variables. Results: In 497 older adults (France, n = 187, Italy, n = 152, UK, n = 158), higher quantities of vegetables consumed were associated with a higher age, affluence score and liking for vegetables, and a lower importance in consumption of familiarity (smallest β = 0.11, p = 0.03). Greater variety was associated with a higher liking and importance of health benefits, and a lower importance of familiarity (smallest β = −0.11, p < 0.01). Higher quantity and variety combined (quantity × variety) was associated with a higher age, liking and importance of health benefits, and a lower importance of familiarity (smallest β = 0.14, p = 0.02). Country-specific effects were also found (smallest β = 0.20, p < 0.01). Conclusions: These findings demonstrate a role for liking and a lower concern for eating familiar foods in vegetable consumption, and a particular role for concern for health benefits in the consumption of a greater variety of vegetables.

This source preferred by Ann Hemingway, Heather Hartwell and Katherine Appleton

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Appleton, K.M., Dinnella, C., Spinelli, S., Morizet, D., Saulais, L., Hemingway, A., Monteleone, E., Depezay, L., Perez-Cueto, F.J.A. and Hartwell, H.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/29693/

Journal: NUTRIENTS

Volume: 9

Issue: 9

ISSN: 2072-6643

DOI: 10.3390/nu9090923

The data on this page was last updated at 04:43 on November 23, 2017.