How safe is adventure tourism in New Zealand? An exploratory analysis

This data was imported from pubmed:

Authors: Bentley, T., Page, S., Meyer, D., Chalmers, D. and Laird, I.

Journal: Appl Ergon

Publication Date: August 2001

Volume: 32

Issue: 4

Pages: 327-338

ISSN: 0003-6870

The paper reports findings from a multidisciplinary programme of research, the major aims of which were to determine the nature and extent of the New Zealand adventure tourism injury problem. Analysis of hospital discharge and mortality data for a 15-year period identified adventure tourism-related activities as contributing to approximately 20% of overseas visitor injuries, and 22% of fatalities. Activities that commonly involve independent-unguided adventure tourism, notably mountaineering, skiing and tramping, contributed most to injury and fatality incidence. Horse riding and cycling activities were identified from hospital discharge data and adventure tourism operators' reported client injury-incidence, as the commercial adventure tourism activities most frequently involved in client injuries. Falls were the most common injury events, and a range of client, equipment, environmental and organisational risk factors were identified. Possible interventions to reduce injury risk among overseas and domestic adventure tourists are discussed.

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This data was imported from scopus:

Authors: Bentley, T., Page, S., Meyer, D., Chalmers, D. and Laird, I.

Citations: 26

Journal: Applied Ergonomics

Publication Date: 2001

Volume: 32

Issue: 4

Pages: 327-338

ISSN: 0003-6870

DOI: 10.1016/S0003-6870(01)00011-4

The paper reports findings from a multidisciplinary programme of research, the major aims of which were to determine the nature and extent of the New Zealand adventure tourism injury problem. Analysis of hospital discharge and mortality data for a 15-year period identified adventure tourism-related activities as contributing to approximately 20% of overseas visitor injuries, and 22% of fatalities. Activities that commonly involve independent-unguided adventure tourism, notably mountaineering, skiing and tramping, contributed most to injury and fatality incidence. Horse riding and cycling activities were identified from hospital discharge data and adventure tourism operators' reported client injury-incidence, as the commercial adventure tourism activities most frequently involved in client injuries. Falls were the most common injury events, and a range of client, equipment, environmental and organisational risk factors were identified. Possible interventions to reduce injury risk among overseas and domestic adventure tourists are discussed. Copyright © 2001 Elsevier Science Ltd.

This data was imported from wos-lite:

Authors: Bentley, T., Page, S., Meyer, D., Chalmers, D. and Laird, I.

Citations: 18

Journal: APPLIED ERGONOMICS

Publication Date: August 2001

Volume: 32

Issue: 4

Pages: 327-338

ISSN: 0003-6870

DOI: 10.1016/S0003-6870(01)00011-4

The data on this page was last updated at 03:36 on October 30, 2014.