A preliminary assessment of two hospital food service systems using parameters of food safety and consumer opinion

This source preferred by Heather Hartwell

Authors: Hartwell, H. and Edwards, J.

http://rsh.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/121/4/236

Journal: Journal of the Royal Society for the Promotion of Health

Volume: 121

Pages: 236-242

ISSN: 1466-4240

The goal of any hospital caterer should be to provide food that meets nutritional requirements, satisfies the patient, improves morale and is microbiologically safe. Food distribution to hospital wards plays a critical role. The aim of this study was to compare two hospital food service systems using parameters of food safety and consumer opinion.

An NHS hospital was selected where food delivery was due to change from a plated system to a cafeteria trolley system.

Samples (50g) of dishes (n=27) considered to be high-risk were collected for three consecutive days from breakfast, lunch and supper meals. The samples were taken from a pre-ordered tray (similar to that of a patient) in the plated system and from the trolley on the ward in the cafeteria system of meal delivery (approximately six months after its introduction). Consumer opinion cards (n=180) were distributed and interviews also conducted.

Microbiologically, the quality of food items delivered by both systems was satisfactory. However, concern was raised with the plated system, not for hot foods cooling down but for chilled foods warming up and being sustained in ambient conditions. Overall consumer satisfaction and experience was enhanced with the trolley system. Food was hotter and generally perceived to be a better quality. Satisfaction with cold desserts was not dependent on the delivery system.

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Hartwell, H. and Edwards, J.S.

Journal: J R Soc Promot Health

Volume: 121

Issue: 4

Pages: 236-242

ISSN: 1466-4240

The goal of any hospital caterer should be to provide food that meets nutritional requirements, satisfies the patient, improves morale and is microbiologically safe. Food distribution to hospital wards plays a critical role. The aim of this study was to compare two hospital food service systems using parameters of food safety and consumer opinion. An NHS hospital was selected where food delivery was due to change from a plated system to a cafeteria trolley system. Samples (50 g) of dishes (n = 27) considered to be high-risk were collected for three consecutive days from breakfast, lunch and supper meals. The samples were taken from a pre-ordered tray (similar to that of a patient) in the plated system and from the trolley on the ward in the cafeteria system of meal delivery (approximately six months after its introduction). Consumer opinions cards (n = 180) were distributed and interviews also conducted. Microbiologically, the quality of food items delivered by both systems was satisfactory. However, concern was raised with the plated system, not for hot foods cooling down but for chilled foods warming up and being sustained in ambient conditions. Overall consumer satisfaction and experience was enhanced with the trolley system. Food was hotter and generally perceived to be of a better quality. Satisfaction with cold desserts was not dependent on the delivery system.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Hartwell, H. and Edwards, J.S.A.

Journal: Journal of The Royal Society for the Promotion of Health

Volume: 121

Issue: 4

Pages: 236-242

ISSN: 1466-4240

The goal of any hospital caterer should be to provide food that meets nutritional requirements, satisfies the patient, improves morale and is microbiologically safe. Food distribution to hospital wards plays a critical role. The aim of this study was to compare two hospital food service systems using parameters of food safety and consumer opinion. An NHS hospital was selected where food delivery was due to change from a plated system to a cafeteria trolley system. Samples (50g) of dishes (n=27) considered to be high-risk were collected for three consecutive days from breakfast, lunch and supper meals. The samples were taken from a pre-ordered tray (similar to that of a patient) in the plated system and from the trolley on the ward in the cafeteria system of meal delivery (approximately six months after its introduction). Consumer opinions cards (n=180) were distributed and interviews also conducted. Microbiologically, the quality of food items delivered by both systems was satisfactory. However, concern was raised with the plated system, not for hot foods cooling down but for chilled foods warming up and being sustained in ambient conditions. Overall consumer satisfaction and experience was enhanced with the trolley system. Food was hotter and generally perceived to be of a better quality. Satisfaction with cold desserts was not dependent on the delivery system.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Hartwell, H. and Edwards, J.S.A.

Journal: JOURNAL OF THE ROYAL SOCIETY FOR THE PROMOTION OF HEALTH

Volume: 121

Issue: 4

Pages: 236-242

ISSN: 1466-4240

DOI: 10.1177/146642400112100407

This data was imported from Europe PubMed Central:

Authors: Hartwell, H. and Edwards, J.S.

Journal: The journal of the Royal Society for the Promotion of Health

Volume: 121

Issue: 4

Pages: 236-242

eISSN: 1476-9042

ISSN: 1466-4240

The goal of any hospital caterer should be to provide food that meets nutritional requirements, satisfies the patient, improves morale and is microbiologically safe. Food distribution to hospital wards plays a critical role. The aim of this study was to compare two hospital food service systems using parameters of food safety and consumer opinion. An NHS hospital was selected where food delivery was due to change from a plated system to a cafeteria trolley system. Samples (50 g) of dishes (n = 27) considered to be high-risk were collected for three consecutive days from breakfast, lunch and supper meals. The samples were taken from a pre-ordered tray (similar to that of a patient) in the plated system and from the trolley on the ward in the cafeteria system of meal delivery (approximately six months after its introduction). Consumer opinions cards (n = 180) were distributed and interviews also conducted. Microbiologically, the quality of food items delivered by both systems was satisfactory. However, concern was raised with the plated system, not for hot foods cooling down but for chilled foods warming up and being sustained in ambient conditions. Overall consumer satisfaction and experience was enhanced with the trolley system. Food was hotter and generally perceived to be of a better quality. Satisfaction with cold desserts was not dependent on the delivery system.

The data on this page was last updated at 04:47 on December 18, 2017.