Whale-watching in Kaikoura: Sustainable destination development?

This source preferred by Susanna Curtin

Authors: Curtin, S.C.

http://www.multilingual-matters.net/jet/002/0173/jet0020173.pdf

Journal: Journal of Ecotourism

Volume: 2

Pages: 173-195

ISSN: 1472-4049

DOI: 10.1080/14724040308668143

Whale-watching is a relatively new and dynamic US$1 billion industry which provides a high rate of return and significant economic benefit to many peripheral coastal regions throughout the world. Trips are generally comprised of viewing several species of whales, dolphins and other marine mammals, as well as pelagic birds. Based purely on the biodiversity of the world's oceans, it requires careful management and planning. Due to its phenomenal growth of 12.1% per year, there is an urgent research agenda. This article examines the role of whale-watching as a form of sustainable tourism development with particular reference to a case study in Kaikoura, New Zealand. Its purpose is to place whale-watching in context with other nature-based tourism activities and to propose a sustainable model for its development based upon 'limits of acceptable change'. This review paper is predominantly based upon the examination of academic literature, with a particular focus on government commissioned reports on the potential impacts of further development at Kaikoura. The literature review was combined with a field visit, interviews and correspondence with the major operator in the case study area.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Curtin, S.

Journal: Journal of Ecotourism

Volume: 2

Issue: 3

Pages: 173-195

ISSN: 1472-4049

DOI: 10.1080/14724040308668143

Whale-watching is a relatively new and dynamic US$1 billion industry which provides a high rate of return and significant economic benefit to many peripheral coastal regions throughout the world. Trips are generally comprised of viewing several species of whales, dolphins and other marine mammals, as well as pelagic birds. Based purely on the biodiversity of the world's oceans, it requires careful management and planning. Due to its phenomenal growth of 12.1% per year, there is an urgent research agenda. This article examines the role of whale-watching as a form of sustainable tourism development with particular reference to a case study in Kaikoura, New Zealand. Its purpose is to place whale-watching in context with other nature-based tourism activities and to propose a sustainable model for its development based upon 'limits of acceptable change'. This review paper is predominantly based upon the examination of academic literature, with a particular focus on government commissioned reports on the potential impacts of further development at Kaikoura. The literature review was combined with a field visit, interviews and correspondence with the major operator in the case study area. © 2003 S. Curtin.

The data on this page was last updated at 04:45 on January 16, 2018.