When enough is not enough: Shorebirds and shellfishing

This source preferred by Richard Stillman

Authors: Goss-Custard, J.D., Stillman, R.A., West, A.D., Caldow, R.W.G., Triplet, P., Durell, S.E.A.L.V.D. and McGrorty, S.

http://www.journals.royalsoc.ac.uk/media/p3d6fjvgmh4vucutmtfg/contributions/7/3/j/e/73je2ph4r6tp4phw.pdf

Journal: Proceedings of The Royal Society B: Biological Sciences

Volume: 271

Pages: 233-237

ISSN: 0962-8452

DOI: 10.1098/rspb.2003.2602

In a number of extensive coastal areas in northwest Europe, large numbers of long-lived migrant birds eat shellfish that are also commercially harvested. Competition between birds and people for this resource often leads to conflicts between commercial and conservation interests. One policy to prevent shellfishing from harming birds is to ensure that enough food remains after harvesting to meet most or all of their energy demands. Using simulations with behaviour-based models of five areas, we show here that even leaving enough shellfish to meet 100% of the birds’ demands may fail to ensure that birds survive in good condition. Up to almost eight times this amount is needed to protect them from being harmed by the shellfishery, even when the birds can consume other kinds of non-harvested prey.

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Goss-Custard, J.D., Stillman, R.A., West, A.D., Caldow, R.W.G., Triplet, P., le V dit Durell, S.E.A. and McGrorty, S.

Journal: Proc Biol Sci

Volume: 271

Issue: 1536

Pages: 233-237

ISSN: 0962-8452

DOI: 10.1098/rspb.2003.2602

In a number of extensive coastal areas in northwest Europe, large numbers of long-lived migrant birds eat shellfish that are also commercially harvested. Competition between birds and people for this resource often leads to conflicts between commercial and conservation interests. One policy to prevent shellfishing from harming birds is to ensure that enough food remains after harvesting to meet most or all of their energy demands. Using simulations with behaviour-based models of five areas, we show here that even leaving enough shellfish to meet 100% of the birds' demands may fail to ensure that birds survive in good condition. Up to almost eight times this amount is needed to protect them from being harmed by the shellfishery, even when the birds can consume other kinds of non-harvested prey.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Goss-Custard, J.D., Stillman, R.A., West, A.D., Caldow, R.W.G., Triplet, P., Dit Durell, S.E.A.L.V. and McGrorty, S.

Journal: Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences

Volume: 271

Issue: 1536

Pages: 233-237

eISSN: 1471-2970

ISSN: 0962-8452

DOI: 10.1098/rspb.2003.2602

In a number of extensive coastal areas in northwest Europe, large numbers of long-lived migrant birds eat shellfish that are also commercially harvested. Competition between birds and people for this resource often leads to conflicts between commercial and conservation interests. One policy to prevent shellfishing from harming birds is to ensure that enough food remains after harvesting to meet most or all of their energy demands. Using simulations with behaviour-based models of five areas, we show here that even leaving enough shellfish to meet 100% of the birds' demands may fail to ensure that birds survive in good condition. Up to almost eight times this amount is needed to protect them from being harmed by the shellfishery, even when the birds can consume other kinds of non-harvested prey.

This data was imported from Europe PubMed Central:

Authors: Goss-Custard, J.D., Stillman, R.A., West, A.D., Caldow, R.W., Triplet, P., le V dit Durell, S.E. and McGrorty, S.

Journal: Proceedings. Biological sciences

Volume: 271

Issue: 1536

Pages: 233-237

eISSN: 1471-2954

ISSN: 0962-8452

In a number of extensive coastal areas in northwest Europe, large numbers of long-lived migrant birds eat shellfish that are also commercially harvested. Competition between birds and people for this resource often leads to conflicts between commercial and conservation interests. One policy to prevent shellfishing from harming birds is to ensure that enough food remains after harvesting to meet most or all of their energy demands. Using simulations with behaviour-based models of five areas, we show here that even leaving enough shellfish to meet 100% of the birds' demands may fail to ensure that birds survive in good condition. Up to almost eight times this amount is needed to protect them from being harmed by the shellfishery, even when the birds can consume other kinds of non-harvested prey.

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