Dispersal patterns among olive colobus in Taï National Park

This source preferred by Amanda Korstjens

Authors: Schippers, E.P. and Korstjens, A.H.

http://www.springerlink.com/content/r4j71773v239q622/

Journal: International Journal of Primatology

Volume: 24

Pages: 515-539

ISSN: 0164-0291

DOI: 10.1023/A:1023784213317

In Primates, females are more likely to be philopatric than males. However, in some species like Procolobus verus, females or individuals of both sexes disperse. In Taï National Park, Ivory Coast, olive colobus groups are small, with one or two adult males and 6 females. Dispersal is common for juveniles and adults of both sexes. Adult male dispersal is less common than adult female dispersal. Adult females immigrated especially into small, one-male groups indicating that food competition played a role. Furthermore, unknown sexually receptive females visited resident groups and mated with the resident males for a few days before disappearing again. Adult males dispersed when this improved their mating opportunities. All juveniles left their natal groups. The dispersal of juveniles may be a strategy to prevent inbreeding with their parents. Dispersal by juvenile males furthermore seemed to be the result of mate competition. The high dispersal rates, visits by receptive females, and dispersal of all individuals in the population suggest that moving between groups is a strategy that can be used ad hoc in several situations more easily in the olive colobus than in most other primates. The predation risks related to moving between groups were reduced by dispersing in conspecific or allospecific groups and by dispersing to neighboring groups.

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Authors: Korstjens, A.H. and Schippers, E.P.

Journal: International Journal of Primatology

Volume: 24

Issue: 3

Pages: 515-539

ISSN: 0164-0291

DOI: 10.1023/A:1023784213317

In Primates, females are more likely to be philopatric than males. However, in some species like Procolobus verus, females or individuals of both sexes disperse. In Taï National Park, Ivory Coast, olive colobus groups are small, with one or two adult males and ≤6 females. Dispersal is common for juveniles and adults of both sexes. Adult male dispersal is less common than adult female dispersal. Adult females immigrated especially into small, one-male groups indicating that food competition played a role. Furthermore, unknown sexually receptive females visited resident groups and mated with the resident males for a few days before disappearing again. Adult males dispersed when this improved their mating opportunities. All juveniles left their natal groups. The dispersal of juveniles may be a strategy to prevent inbreeding with their parents. Dispersal by juvenile males furthermore seemed to be the result of mate competition. The high dispersal rates, visits by receptive females, and dispersal of all individuals in the population suggest that moving between groups is a strategy that can be used ad hoc in several situations more easily in the olive colobus than in most other primates. The predation risks related to moving between groups were reduced by dispersing in conspecific or allospecific groups and by dispersing to neighboring groups.

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