The effectiveness of some mechanisms of reproductive isolation in Arum maculatum and A-italicum (Araceae)

This source preferred by Anita Diaz

Authors: Diaz, A., Amoin, M.A. and Gibernau, M.

http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1095-8339.2006.00469.x

Journal: Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society

Volume: 150

Pages: 323-328

ISSN: 0024-4074

DOI: 10.1111/j.1095-8339.2006.00469.x

Mechanisms of reproductive isolation were studied in two species of Arum, A. italicum and A. maculatum, growing in England and the south of France. The study focused on three potential mechanisms for reproductive isolation: the effectiveness of dichogamy as a barrier to autogamy; the ability of self and outcrossed pollen to germinate on stigmas at different stages of anthesis and to effect pollination; and postzygotic barriers to selfing. Dichogamy was found to provide a very effective barrier to within-inflorescence selfing in these species, as no seeds were produced by spontaneous self-pollination (i.e. autogamy) in any population of either species. However, the study found that geitonogamy (cross-pollination between inflorescences of a same individual or clone) was possible, as genotypes frequently produced several inflorescences and stigmas were found to be receptive to pollen from before anthesis until their contraction at the end of the female phase of flowering. Hand pollination with self pollen from clone inflorescences produced as numerous and heavy seeds as outcross pollination. In addition, the germination and growth of geitonogamously produced seed was similar to that of outcrossed seed, suggesting that this potential postzygotic barrier is absent or weak. These findings suggest that geitonogamous seed production may be unrestricted by significant pre- or postzygotic barriers. The possible advantages of geitonogamy in Arum are discussed.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Diaz, A., Amoin, M.A. and Gibernau, M.

Journal: Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society

Volume: 150

Issue: 3

Pages: 323-328

eISSN: 1095-8339

ISSN: 0024-4074

DOI: 10.1111/j.1095-8339.2006.00469.x

Mechanisms of reproductive isolation were studied in two species of Arum, A. italicum and A. maculatum, growing in England and the south of France. The study focused on three potential mechanisms for reproductive isolation: the effectiveness of dichogamy as a barrier to autogamy; the ability of self and outcrossed pollen to germinate on stigmas at different stages of anthesis and to effect pollination; and postzygotic barriers to selfing. Dichogamy was found to provide a very effective barrier to within-inflorescence selfing in these species, as no seeds were produced by spontaneous self-pollination (i.e. autogamy) in any population of either species. However, the study found that geitonogamy (cross-pollination between inflorescences of a same individual or clone) was possible, as genotypes frequently produced several inflorescences and stigmas were found to be receptive to pollen from before anthesis until their contraction at the end of the female phase of flowering. Hand pollination with self pollen from clone inflorescences produced as numerous and heavy seeds as outcross pollination. In addition, the germination and growth of geitonogamously produced seed was similar to that of outcrossed seed, suggesting that this potential postzygotic barrier is absent or weak. These findings suggest that geitonogamous seed production may be unrestricted by significant pre- or postzygotic barriers. The possible advantages of geitonogamy in Arum are discussed. © 2006 The Linnean Society of London.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Diaz, A., Amoin, M.A. and Gibernau, M.

Journal: BOTANICAL JOURNAL OF THE LINNEAN SOCIETY

Volume: 150

Issue: 3

Pages: 323-328

ISSN: 0024-4074

DOI: 10.1111/j.1095-8339.2006.00469.x

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