Born to yawn? Cortisol linked to yawning: A new hypothesis

This source preferred by Simon Thompson

Authors: Thompson, S.

Journal: Medical Hypotheses

Volume: 77

Pages: 861-862

ISSN: 0306-9877

DOI: 10.1016/j.mehy.2011.07.056

Yawning has become an interesting and curious scientific conundrum. Links between several neurological disorders can be found through the commonality of yawning episodes and contagious yawning. However, the reasons why we yawn are uncertain. Cortisol levels are known to rise during stress and fatigue; yawning may occur when we are under stress or tired. We do not know whether cortisol levels fluctuate during yawning. Potentially, yawning and cortisol levels may provide a valuable diagnostic tool and warning of untoward underlying neurological problems. A new hypothesis is proposed that links cortisol levels with yawning episodes.

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Thompson, S.B.N.

Journal: Med Hypotheses

Volume: 77

Issue: 5

Pages: 861-862

eISSN: 1532-2777

DOI: 10.1016/j.mehy.2011.07.056

Yawning has become an interesting and curious scientific conundrum. Links between several neurological disorders can be found through the commonality of yawning episodes and contagious yawning. However, the reasons why we yawn are uncertain. Cortisol levels are known to rise during stress and fatigue; yawning may occur when we are under stress or tired. We do not know whether cortisol levels fluctuate during yawning. Potentially, yawning and cortisol levels may provide a valuable diagnostic tool and warning of untoward underlying neurological problems. A new hypothesis is proposed that links cortisol levels with yawning episodes.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Thompson, S.B.N.

Journal: Medical Hypotheses

Volume: 77

Issue: 5

Pages: 861-862

eISSN: 1532-2777

ISSN: 0306-9877

DOI: 10.1016/j.mehy.2011.07.056

Yawning has become an interesting and curious scientific conundrum. Links between several neurological disorders can be found through the commonality of yawning episodes and contagious yawning. However, the reasons why we yawn are uncertain. Cortisol levels are known to rise during stress and fatigue; yawning may occur when we are under stress or tired. We do not know whether cortisol levels fluctuate during yawning. Potentially, yawning and cortisol levels may provide a valuable diagnostic tool and warning of untoward underlying neurological problems. A new hypothesis is proposed that links cortisol levels with yawning episodes. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Thompson, S.B.N.

Journal: MEDICAL HYPOTHESES

Volume: 77

Issue: 5

Pages: 861-862

ISSN: 0306-9877

DOI: 10.1016/j.mehy.2011.07.056

This data was imported from Europe PubMed Central:

Authors: Thompson, S.B.

Journal: Medical hypotheses

Volume: 77

Issue: 5

Pages: 861-862

eISSN: 1532-2777

ISSN: 0306-9877

Yawning has become an interesting and curious scientific conundrum. Links between several neurological disorders can be found through the commonality of yawning episodes and contagious yawning. However, the reasons why we yawn are uncertain. Cortisol levels are known to rise during stress and fatigue; yawning may occur when we are under stress or tired. We do not know whether cortisol levels fluctuate during yawning. Potentially, yawning and cortisol levels may provide a valuable diagnostic tool and warning of untoward underlying neurological problems. A new hypothesis is proposed that links cortisol levels with yawning episodes.

The data on this page was last updated at 05:18 on July 20, 2019.