A new generation of complementary medicine users?

This source preferred by Simon Thompson

Authors: Thompson, S.B.N.

Journal: Journal of Complementary and Integrative Medicine

Volume: 9

Pages: 1-11

ISSN: 1553-3840

DOI: 10.1515/1553-3840.1383

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Thompson, S.

Journal: J Complement Integr Med

Volume: 9

Pages: Article-5

eISSN: 1553-3840

DOI: 10.1515/1553-3840.1383

OBJECTIVES: To determine regular use of alternative remedies amongst undergraduate students. DESIGN: Questionnaire covered use of alternative remedies as well as demographic details. SETTINGS/LOCATION: Online completion of the questionnaire. SUBJECTS: Sixty-nine participants (55 female, 14 male) aged between 18 to 30 years studying undergraduate psychology at Bournemouth University, Dorset, UK. INTERVENTIONS: Structured open and closed questions; all questions were given to all of the participants. OUTCOME MEASURES: Qualitative comments were captured as well as percentage of respondents according to answers collected. RESULTS: Most respondents had used remedies for exam "anxiety" and obtained these products from relatives or friends or relatives. CONCLUSIONS: Reasons of effect provided by participants were that they provided a genuine effect; a general effect; or a placebo effect.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Thompson, S.

Journal: Journal of Complementary and Integrative Medicine

Volume: 9

Issue: 1

eISSN: 1553-3840

DOI: 10.1515/1553-3840.1383

Objectives: To determine regular use of alternative remedies amongst undergraduate students. Design: Questionnaire covered use of alternative remedies as well as demographic details. Settings/Location: Online completion of the questionnaire. Subjects: Sixty-nine participants (55 female, 14 male) aged between 18 to 30 years studying undergraduate psychology at Bournemouth University, Dorset, UK. Interventions: Structured open and closed questions; all questions were given to all of the participants. Outcome Measures: Qualitative comments were captured as well as percentage of respondents according to answers collected. Results: Most respondents had used remedies for exam "anxiety" and obtained these products from relatives or friends or relatives. Conclusions: Reasons of effect provided by participants were that they provided a genuine effect; a general effect; or a placebo effect. © 2012 De Gruyter. All rights reserved.

This data was imported from Europe PubMed Central:

Authors: Thompson, S.

Journal: Journal of complementary & integrative medicine

Volume: 9

Pages: Article-5

eISSN: 1553-3840

ISSN: 2194-6329

OBJECTIVES: To determine regular use of alternative remedies amongst undergraduate students. DESIGN: Questionnaire covered use of alternative remedies as well as demographic details. SETTINGS/LOCATION: Online completion of the questionnaire. SUBJECTS: Sixty-nine participants (55 female, 14 male) aged between 18 to 30 years studying undergraduate psychology at Bournemouth University, Dorset, UK. INTERVENTIONS: Structured open and closed questions; all questions were given to all of the participants. OUTCOME MEASURES: Qualitative comments were captured as well as percentage of respondents according to answers collected. RESULTS: Most respondents had used remedies for exam "anxiety" and obtained these products from relatives or friends or relatives. CONCLUSIONS: Reasons of effect provided by participants were that they provided a genuine effect; a general effect; or a placebo effect.

The data on this page was last updated at 04:53 on April 22, 2019.