Testing alternatives to Navon letters to induce a transfer-inappropriate processing shift in face recognition

This source preferred by Peter Arabaci Hills

Authors: Hills, P.J. and Lewis, M.B.

Journal: European Journal of Cognitive Psychology

Volume: 20

Pages: 561-576

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

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Authors: Hills, P.J. and Lewis, M.B.

Journal: European Journal of Cognitive Psychology

Volume: 20

Issue: 3

Pages: 561-576

eISSN: 1464-0635

ISSN: 0954-1446

DOI: 10.1080/09541440701728524

Processing the local features of a Navon letter (a large global letter made up of small letters) causes a reduction in face identification accuracy (Macrae & Lewis, 2002). This is similar to the verbal overshadowing effect (where describing a face causes it to be less well recognised, see e.g., Schooler & Engstler-Schooler, 1990). Three experiments are presented that explore this Navon effect. Experiment 1 replicates the Navon effect using a new set of stimuli. Experiment 2 extends the effect using Navon shapes in a manner that removes verbal responses. Extending the logic of the proposed transfer-inappropriate processing shift explanation, Experiment 3 attempted to show the same effect using spatial-frequency filtered faces as an induction akin to Navon stimuli. The equivalent effect was not observed. We discuss whether the results indicate that the Navon effect is due to a different mechanism from the verbal overshadowing effect. © 2007 Psychology Press.

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