Her majesty the student: marketised higher education and the narcissistic (dis)satisfactions of the student-consumer

Authors: Nixon, E., Scullion, R. and Hearn, R.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/24391/

Journal: Studies in Higher Education

Publisher: Taylor & Francis (Routledge): SSH Titles

ISSN: 1470-174X

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Nixon, E., Scullion, R. and Hearn, R.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/24391/

Journal: Studies in Higher Education

Volume: 43

Issue: 6

Pages: 927-943

eISSN: 1470-174X

ISSN: 0307-5079

DOI: 10.1080/03075079.2016.1196353

© 2016 Society for Research into Higher Education. Intensifying marketisation across higher education (HE) in England continues to generate critical commentary on the potentially devastating consequences of market logic for pedagogy. In this paper, we consider the student-consumer prominent in these debates as a contested yet under-analysed entity. In contrast to the dominance of homo economicus discursively constructed in policy, we offer a psychoanalytically informed interpretation of undergraduate student narratives, in an educational culture in which the student is positioned as sovereign consumer. We report findings drawn from in-depth interviews that sought to investigate students’ experiences of choice within their university experience. Our critical interpretation shows how market ideology in an HE context amplifies the expression of deeper narcissistic desires and aggressive instincts that appear to underpin some of the student ‘satisfaction’ and ‘dissatisfaction’ so crucial to the contemporary marketised HE institution. Our analysis suggests that narcissistic gratifications and frustrations may lie at the root of the damage to pedagogy inflicted by unreflective neoliberal agendas.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Nixon, E., Scullion, R. and Hearn, R.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/24391/

Journal: STUDIES IN HIGHER EDUCATION

Volume: 43

Issue: 6

Pages: 927-943

eISSN: 1470-174X

ISSN: 0307-5079

DOI: 10.1080/03075079.2016.1196353

The data on this page was last updated at 10:28 on April 24, 2019.