‘It’s quite difficult letting them go, isn’t it?’ UK parents’ experiences of their child’s higher education choice process

Authors: Haywood, H. and Scullion, R.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/29217/

Journal: Studies in higher education

Publisher: Carfax Publishing Ltd.

ISSN: 0307-5079

DOI: 10.1080/03075079.2017.1315084

This paper challenges the dominant discourse that Higher Education (HE) choice is a consumer choice and questions assumptions underpinning government policy and HE marketing. HE choice is largely viewed as a rational, decontextualised process. However, this interpretivist study found it to be much more complex, and to be about relationships and managing a transition in roles. It focuses on parents, an under-researched group, who play an increasing part in their child’s HE choice. It finds that they experience this process primarily as parents, not consumers and that their desire to maintain the relationship at this critical juncture takes precedence over the choice of particular courses and universities. The role of relationships, and in this context relationship maintenance, is the main theme. This is experienced in two principal ways: relationship maintenance through conflict avoidance and through teamwork. These significant findings have implications for the way governments and universities consider recruitment.

Authors: Haywood, H. and Scullion, R.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/29217/

Journal: Studies in higher education

Publisher: Carfax Publishing Ltd.

ISSN: 0307-5079

This paper challenges the dominant discourse that Higher Education (HE) choice is a consumer choice and questions assumptions underpinning government policy and HE marketing. HE choice is largely viewed as a rational, decontextualised process. However, this interpretivist study found it to be much more complex, and to be about relationships and managing a transition in roles. It focuses on parents, an under-researched group, who play an increasing part in their child’s HE choice. It finds that they experience this process primarily as parents, not consumers and that their desire to maintain the relationship at this critical juncture takes precedence over the choice of particular courses and universities. The role of relationships, and in this context relationship maintenance, is the main theme. This is experienced in two principal ways: relationship maintenance through conflict avoidance and through teamwork. These significant findings have implications for the way governments and universities consider recruitment. © 2017 Society for Research into Higher Education

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Haywood, H. and Scullion, R.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/29217/

Journal: Studies in Higher Education

Volume: 43

Issue: 12

Pages: 2161-2175

eISSN: 1470-174X

ISSN: 0307-5079

DOI: 10.1080/03075079.2017.1315084

© 2017, © 2017 Society for Research into Higher Education. This paper challenges the dominant discourse that Higher Education (HE) choice is a consumer choice and questions assumptions underpinning government policy and HE marketing. HE choice is largely viewed as a rational, decontextualised process. However, this interpretivist study found it to be much more complex, and to be about relationships and managing a transition in roles. It focuses on parents, an under-researched group, who play an increasing part in their child’s HE choice. It finds that they experience this process primarily as parents, not consumers and that their desire to maintain the relationship at this critical juncture takes precedence over the choice of particular courses and universities. The role of relationships, and in this context relationship maintenance, is the main theme. This is experienced in two principal ways: relationship maintenance through conflict avoidance and through teamwork. These significant findings have implications for the way governments and universities consider recruitment.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Haywood, H. and Scullion, R.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/29217/

Journal: STUDIES IN HIGHER EDUCATION

Volume: 43

Issue: 12

Pages: 2161-2175

eISSN: 1470-174X

ISSN: 0307-5079

DOI: 10.1080/03075079.2017.1315084

The data on this page was last updated at 04:57 on June 24, 2019.