The contribution of theory to the design, delivery, and evaluation of interprofessional curricula: BEME Guide No. 49

Authors: Hean, S., Anderson, E., Green, C., John, C., Morris, D., O`Halloran, C. and Pitt, R.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/30232/

Journal: Medical teacher

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISSN: 0142-159X

BACKGROUND: Interprofessional curricula have often lacked explicit reference to theory despite calls for a more theoretically informed field that illuminates curricular assumptions and justifies curricular practices. AIM: To review the contributions of theory to the design, delivery, and evaluation of interprofessional curricula. METHODS: Four databases were searched (1988-2015). Studies demonstrating explicit and a high-quality contribution of theory to the design, delivery or evaluation of interprofessional curricula were included. Data were extracted against a comprehensive framework of curricular activities and a narrative synthesis undertaken. RESULTS: Ninety-one studies met the inclusion criteria. The majority of studies (86%) originated from the UK, USA, and Canada. Theories most commonly underpinned "learning activities" (47%) and "evaluation" (54%). Theories of reflective learning, identity formation, and contact hypothesis dominated the field though there are many examples of innovative theoretical contributions. CONCLUSIONS: Theories contribute considerably to the interprofessional field, though many curricular elements remain under-theorized. The literature offers no "gold standard" theory for interprofessional curricula; rather theoretical selection is contingent upon the curricular component to which theory is to be applied. Theories contributed to interprofessional curricula by explaining, predicting, organizing or illuminating social processes embedded in interprofessional curricular assumptions. This review provides guidance how theory might be robustly and appropriately deployed in the design, delivery, and evaluation of interprofessional curricula.

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Hean, S., Green, C., Anderson, E., Morris, D., John, C., Pitt, R. and O'Halloran, C.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/30232/

Journal: Med Teach

Volume: 40

Issue: 6

Pages: 542-558

eISSN: 1466-187X

DOI: 10.1080/0142159X.2018.1432851

BACKGROUND: Interprofessional curricula have often lacked explicit reference to theory despite calls for a more theoretically informed field that illuminates curricular assumptions and justifies curricular practices. AIM: To review the contributions of theory to the design, delivery, and evaluation of interprofessional curricula. METHODS: Four databases were searched (1988-2015). Studies demonstrating explicit and a high-quality contribution of theory to the design, delivery or evaluation of interprofessional curricula were included. Data were extracted against a comprehensive framework of curricular activities and a narrative synthesis undertaken. RESULTS: Ninety-one studies met the inclusion criteria. The majority of studies (86%) originated from the UK, USA, and Canada. Theories most commonly underpinned "learning activities" (47%) and "evaluation" (54%). Theories of reflective learning, identity formation, and contact hypothesis dominated the field though there are many examples of innovative theoretical contributions. CONCLUSIONS: Theories contribute considerably to the interprofessional field, though many curricular elements remain under-theorized. The literature offers no "gold standard" theory for interprofessional curricula; rather theoretical selection is contingent upon the curricular component to which theory is to be applied. Theories contributed to interprofessional curricula by explaining, predicting, organizing or illuminating social processes embedded in interprofessional curricular assumptions. This review provides guidance how theory might be robustly and appropriately deployed in the design, delivery, and evaluation of interprofessional curricula.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Hean, S., Green, C., Anderson, E., Morris, D., John, C., Pitt, R. and O’Halloran, C.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/30232/

Journal: Medical Teacher

Volume: 40

Issue: 6

Pages: 542-558

eISSN: 1466-187X

ISSN: 0142-159X

DOI: 10.1080/0142159X.2018.1432851

© 2018, © 2018 AMEE. Background: Interprofessional curricula have often lacked explicit reference to theory despite calls for a more theoretically informed field that illuminates curricular assumptions and justifies curricular practices. Aim: To review the contributions of theory to the design, delivery, and evaluation of interprofessional curricula. Methods: Four databases were searched (1988–2015). Studies demonstrating explicit and a high-quality contribution of theory to the design, delivery or evaluation of interprofessional curricula were included. Data were extracted against a comprehensive framework of curricular activities and a narrative synthesis undertaken. Results: Ninety-one studies met the inclusion criteria. The majority of studies (86%) originated from the UK, USA, and Canada. Theories most commonly underpinned “learning activities” (47%) and “evaluation” (54%). Theories of reflective learning, identity formation, and contact hypothesis dominated the field though there are many examples of innovative theoretical contributions. Conclusions: Theories contribute considerably to the interprofessional field, though many curricular elements remain under-theorized. The literature offers no “gold standard” theory for interprofessional curricula; rather theoretical selection is contingent upon the curricular component to which theory is to be applied. Theories contributed to interprofessional curricula by explaining, predicting, organizing or illuminating social processes embedded in interprofessional curricular assumptions. This review provides guidance how theory might be robustly and appropriately deployed in the design, delivery, and evaluation of interprofessional curricula.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Hean, S., Green, C., Anderson, E., Morris, D., John, C., Pitt, R. and O'Halloran, C.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/30232/

Journal: MEDICAL TEACHER

Volume: 40

Issue: 6

Pages: 542-558

eISSN: 1466-187X

ISSN: 0142-159X

DOI: 10.1080/0142159X.2018.1432851

The data on this page was last updated at 05:16 on February 19, 2020.