Travelling with a purpose: An ethnographic study of the eudemonic experiences of volunteer expedition participants

Authors: Curtin, S. and Brown, L.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/31256/

Journal: Tourist Studies

Purposeful travel is apparent in new modes of tourism and particularly in volunteer holidays where tourists are searching for meaningful experiences that provide a sense of physical, emotional or spiritual fulfilment. Based on a qualitative study using participant observation, this paper adopted the concept of eudemonia to explore the experiences of participants on an elephant conservation expedition to Bardia National Park, Nepal. Volunteer travel is used to connect with and understand the wider world. Rather than an escape, these journeys allowed participants to experience first-hand the hardships and realities of people in other countries; creating greater perspective and making them ‘better people’ on their return. Feeling virtuous can only be mobilised, however, if participants felt themselves to be useful rather than a passive or ill-equipped bystander. Findings also revealed how the return home is not always easy; that the process of re-entry can be isolating.

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Authors: Curtin, S. and Brown, L.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/31256/

Journal: Tourist Studies

Volume: 19

Issue: 2

Pages: 192-214

eISSN: 1741-3206

ISSN: 1468-7976

DOI: 10.1177/1468797618804162

© The Author(s) 2018. Purposeful travel is apparent in new modes of tourism and particularly in volunteer holidays where tourists are searching for meaningful experiences that provide a sense of physical, emotional or spiritual fulfilment. Based on a qualitative study using participant observation, this article adopted the concept of eudemonia to explore the experiences of participants on an elephant conservation expedition to Bardia National Park, Nepal. Volunteer travel is used to connect with and understand the wider world. Rather than an escape, these journeys allowed participants to experience first-hand the hardships and realities of people in other countries; creating greater perspective and making them ‘better people’ on their return. Feeling virtuous can only be mobilised, however, if participants felt themselves to be useful rather than a passive or ill-equipped bystander. Findings also revealed how the return home is not always easy; that the process of re-entry can be isolating.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Curtin, S. and Brown, L.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/31256/

Journal: TOURIST STUDIES

Volume: 19

Issue: 2

Pages: 192-214

eISSN: 1741-3206

ISSN: 1468-7976

DOI: 10.1177/1468797618804162

The data on this page was last updated at 04:55 on May 22, 2019.