Tai Chi for the prevention of falls among older adults: A critical analysis of the evidence

Authors: Nyman, S.R.

Journal: Journal of Aging and Physical Activity

Volume: 29

Issue: 2

Pages: 343-352

eISSN: 1543-267X

ISSN: 1063-8652

DOI: 10.1123/JAPA.2020-0155

Abstract:

Despite interest as to the benefits of Tai Chi, there remains a controversy over its effectiveness as an exercise intervention for preventing falls among older adults. This review synthesizes the evidence base with a focus on meta-analyses and randomized controlled trials with community-dwelling older adults. It provides a critical lens on the evidence and quality of the trials. High-quality evidence suggests that Tai Chi is an effective intervention for preventing falls in community settings; however, there is unclear evidence for long-term care facilities and an absence of evidence for hospital settings. When compared directly with other exercise interventions, Tai Chi may offer a superior strategy for reducing falls through its benefits on cognitive functioning. Using data from the current Cochrane review, a new synthesis is presented suggesting that 71–81% of community-dwelling older adults are adherent to class-based Tai Chi interventions. The practical opportunities and challenges for practitioners are discussed.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/34216/

Source: Scopus

Tai Chi for the Prevention of Falls Among Older Adults: A Critical Analysis of the Evidence.

Authors: Nyman, S.R.

Journal: J Aging Phys Act

Volume: 29

Issue: 2

Pages: 343-352

eISSN: 1543-267X

DOI: 10.1123/japa.2020-0155

Abstract:

Despite interest as to the benefits of Tai Chi, there remains a controversy over its effectiveness as an exercise intervention for preventing falls among older adults. This review synthesizes the evidence base with a focus on meta-analyses and randomized controlled trials with community-dwelling older adults. It provides a critical lens on the evidence and quality of the trials. High-quality evidence suggests that Tai Chi is an effective intervention for preventing falls in community settings; however, there is unclear evidence for long-term care facilities and an absence of evidence for hospital settings. When compared directly with other exercise interventions, Tai Chi may offer a superior strategy for reducing falls through its benefits on cognitive functioning. Using data from the current Cochrane review, a new synthesis is presented suggesting that 71-81% of community-dwelling older adults are adherent to class-based Tai Chi interventions. The practical opportunities and challenges for practitioners are discussed.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/34216/

Source: PubMed

Tai Chi for the prevention of falls among older people: A critical analysis of the evidence

Authors: Nyman, S.R.

Journal: Journal of Aging and Physical Activity

Volume: 29

Issue: 2

Pages: 343-352

Publisher: Human Kinetics Publishers Inc.

ISSN: 1063-8652

Abstract:

Despite interest as to the benefits of Tai Chi, there remains controversy over its effectiveness as an exercise intervention to prevent falls among older people. This review synthesises the evidence-base with a focus on meta-analyses and randomised controlled trials with community-dwelling older people. It provides a critical lens on the evidence and quality of trials. High quality evidence suggests that Tai Chi is an effective intervention to prevent falls in the community, however, there is unclear evidence for long-term care facilities and an absence of evidence for hospital settings. When compared directly with other exercise interventions, Tai Chi may offer a superior strategy to reduce falls through its benefits on cognitive functioning. Using data from the current Cochrane review, a new synthesis is presented suggesting that 71 - 81% of community-dwelling older people are adherent to class-based Tai Chi interventions. The practical opportunities and challenges for practitioners are discussed.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/34216/

Source: Manual

Tai Chi for the Prevention of Falls Among Older Adults: A Critical Analysis of the Evidence.

Authors: Nyman, S.R.

Journal: Journal of aging and physical activity

Volume: 29

Issue: 2

Pages: 343-352

eISSN: 1543-267X

ISSN: 1063-8652

DOI: 10.1123/japa.2020-0155

Abstract:

Despite interest as to the benefits of Tai Chi, there remains a controversy over its effectiveness as an exercise intervention for preventing falls among older adults. This review synthesizes the evidence base with a focus on meta-analyses and randomized controlled trials with community-dwelling older adults. It provides a critical lens on the evidence and quality of the trials. High-quality evidence suggests that Tai Chi is an effective intervention for preventing falls in community settings; however, there is unclear evidence for long-term care facilities and an absence of evidence for hospital settings. When compared directly with other exercise interventions, Tai Chi may offer a superior strategy for reducing falls through its benefits on cognitive functioning. Using data from the current Cochrane review, a new synthesis is presented suggesting that 71-81% of community-dwelling older adults are adherent to class-based Tai Chi interventions. The practical opportunities and challenges for practitioners are discussed.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/34216/

Source: Europe PubMed Central

Tai Chi for the prevention of falls among older people: A critical analysis of the evidence

Authors: Nyman, S.R.

Journal: Journal of Aging and Physical Activity

Volume: 29

Issue: 2

Pages: 343-352

ISSN: 1063-8652

Abstract:

Despite interest as to the benefits of Tai Chi, there remains controversy over its effectiveness as an exercise intervention to prevent falls among older people. This review synthesises the evidence-base with a focus on meta-analyses and randomised controlled trials with community-dwelling older people. It provides a critical lens on the evidence and quality of trials. High quality evidence suggests that Tai Chi is an effective intervention to prevent falls in the community, however, there is unclear evidence for long-term care facilities and an absence of evidence for hospital settings. When compared directly with other exercise interventions, Tai Chi may offer a superior strategy to reduce falls through its benefits on cognitive functioning. Using data from the current Cochrane review, a new synthesis is presented suggesting that 71 - 81% of community-dwelling older people are adherent to class-based Tai Chi interventions. The practical opportunities and challenges for practitioners are discussed.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/34216/

Source: BURO EPrints