A gap analysis of the legislative, policy, institutional and crises management frameworks for disaster risk management in Cameroon

Authors: Bang, H.N.

Journal: Progress in Disaster Science

Volume: 11

eISSN: 2590-0617

DOI: 10.1016/j.pdisas.2021.100190

Abstract:

This paper evaluates and analyses Cameroon's contemporary legislative, policy, institutional, administrative, and governance/power structures for disaster risk management (DRM) to identify gaps for improvement. A qualitative research strategy was used to assess Cameroon's compliance with international DRM frameworks in order to determine their effectiveness. The Sendai Framework for disaster risk reduction (SFDRR) provided conceptual guidance to the enquiries and systematic analysis. An evaluation of Cameroon's DRM legislation, policies, institutions, and governance suggests the existence of basic structures with on-paper provisions for a decentralised, multi-hazard and multi-disciplinary/agency DRM approach. Embedded in the structures are standard protocols for responding to natural hazards, crises/emergencies, or disasters. Yet, operationally, Cameroon's DRM system is yet to attain its full potential. A gap analysis reveals the frameworks are mainly natural hazard, crises/disaster driven. Details of stakeholder roles and responsibilities are either vague or not explicit in the statutory instruments. The inclusion of clearly defined guidelines for cross-sectoral and multi-stakeholder interventions in the DRM instruments is limited. The DRM frameworks are generally more reactive than proactive and adopts a hierarchical top-down decision making and power structure where lower administrative units are not sufficiently empowered to efficiently perform DRM functions. Generally, the contemporary DRM structures undermine the ability to enhance resilience to disaster risks. Recommendations from a gap analysis suggests that an overhaul of the DRM frameworks is inevitable to curb the rising disaster risks in the country. Any reorganisation must consider elevating the Directorate of Civil Protection to an independent/autonomous structure placed directly under the Prime Minister's Office or the Presidency.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/35827/

Source: Scopus

A gap analysis of the legislative, policy, institutional and crises management frameworks for disaster risk management in Cameroon

Authors: Bang, H.

Journal: Progress in Disaster Sciences

Publisher: Elsevier

ISSN: 2590-0617

DOI: 10.1016/j.pdisas.2021.100190

Abstract:

This paper evaluates and analyses Cameroon's contemporary legislative, policy, institutional, administrative, and governance/power structures for disaster risk management (DRM) to identify gaps for improvement. A qual- itative research strategy was used to assess Cameroon's compliance with international DRM frameworks in order to determine their effectiveness. The Sendai Framework for disaster risk reduction (SFDRR) provided conceptual guidance to the enquiries and systematic analysis. An evaluation of Cameroon's DRM legislation, policies, institu- tions, and governance suggests the existence of basic structures with on-paper provisions for a decentralised, multi-hazard and multi-disciplinary/agency DRM approach. Embedded in the structures are standard protocols for responding to natural hazards, crises/emergencies, or disasters. Yet, operationally, Cameroon's DRM system is yet to attain its full potential. A gap analysis reveals the frameworks are mainly natural hazard, crises/disaster driven. Details of stakeholder roles and responsibilities are either vague or not explicit in the statutory instru- ments. The inclusion of clearly defined guidelines for cross-sectoral and multi-stakeholder interventions in the DRM instruments is limited. The DRM frameworks are generally more reactive than proactive and adopts a hier- archical top-down decision making and power structure where lower administrative units are not sufficiently empowered to efficiently perform DRM functions. Generally, the contemporary DRM structures undermine the ability to enhance resilience to disaster risks. Recommendations from a gap analysis suggests that an overhaul of the DRM frameworks is inevitable to curb the rising disaster risks in the country. Any reorganisation must con- sider elevating the Directorate of Civil Protection to an independent/autonomous structure placed directly under the Prime Minister's Office or the Presidency.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/35827/

Source: Manual