Design and evaluation of a computerised version of the Benton visual retention test

This source preferred by Simon Thompson

Authors: Thompson, S., Ennis, E., Coffin, T. and Farman, S.

http://eprints.bournemouth.ac.uk/cgi/users/home?screen=EPrint%3A%3AStaff%3A%3AEdit&eprintid=7339&_action_jump_core=Core+Bibliographic+Information

Journal: Computers in Human Behavior

Volume: 23

Pages: 2383-2393

ISSN: 0747-5632

DOI: 10.1016/j.chb.2006.03.014

The use of computers in the administration of psychological assessments is often considered standard practice. However, the evidence clearly shows that computerisation of each test needs to be evaluated independently. The current study examined the hypothesis that a computerised administration of the Benton visual retention test (BVRT) should yield comparable results to paper-and-pencil administration of this measure. Forty participants (23 females and 17 males) from a non-clinical population were assessed using a computerised version of the BVRT and the conventional paper-and-pencil administration. Parallel forms of the test were used in the two administrations in order to eliminate practice effects. Participants found the conventional method of assessment easier to use but less fun. Importantly, performances of the participants were poorer when using the computerised version, giving rise to extreme caution when using this method of assessment administration with a clinical population.

This data was imported from DBLP:

Authors: Thompson, S.B.N., Ennis, E., Coffin, T. and Farman, S.

Journal: Computers in Human Behavior

Volume: 23

Pages: 2383-2393

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Thompson, S.B.N., Ennis, E., Coffin, T. and Farman, S.

Journal: Computers in Human Behavior

Volume: 23

Issue: 5

Pages: 2383-2393

ISSN: 0747-5632

DOI: 10.1016/j.chb.2006.03.014

The use of computers in the administration of psychological assessments is often considered standard practice. However, the evidence clearly shows that computerisation of each test needs to be evaluated independently. The current study examined the hypothesis that a computerised administration of the Benton visual retention test (BVRT) should yield comparable results to paper-and-pencil administration of this measure. Forty participants (23 females and 17 males) from a non-clinical population were assessed using a computerised version of the BVRT and the conventional paper-and-pencil administration. Parallel forms of the test were used in the two administrations in order to eliminate practice effects. Participants found the conventional method of assessment easier to use but less fun. Importantly, performances of the participants were poorer when using the computerised version, giving rise to extreme caution when using this method of assessment administration with a clinical population. © 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Thompson, S.B.N., Ennis, E., Coffin, T. and Farman, S.

Journal: COMPUTERS IN HUMAN BEHAVIOR

Volume: 23

Issue: 5

Pages: 2383-2393

ISSN: 0747-5632

DOI: 10.1016/j.chb.2006.03.014

The data on this page was last updated at 05:14 on July 22, 2019.