Building an architecture of participation? Political parties and web 2.0 in Britain

This source preferred by Darren Lilleker

Authors: Jackson, N. and Lilleker, D.

Journal: Journal of Information Technology & Politics

Volume: 6

Pages: 232-250

ISSN: 1933-1681

DOI: 10.1080/19331680903028438

This article examines the differences between Web 1.0 and Web 2.0 and how these Web strategies are used within a political communication context. The data focus on how political parties (and their leaders) in Britain use Web 2.0 applications. We consider whether the content political elites published in their Web 2.0 applications is shovelware and more appropriate for Web 1.0, or if a genuinely Web 2.0 style of political communication is emerging. We investigate the extent to which there has been a shift in the way British politicians communicate or if caution over co-production, coupled with the demands of electioneering, is restricting the development of interactivity. Our analysis suggests that British political parties have sought to create a “Web 1.5” that offers the advantages of both Web 1.0 and Web 2.0.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Jackson, N.A. and Lilleker, D.G.

Journal: Journal of Information Technology and Politics

Volume: 6

Issue: 3-4

Pages: 232-250

eISSN: 1933-169X

ISSN: 1933-1681

DOI: 10.1080/19331680903028438

This article examines the differences between Web 1.0 and Web 2.0 and how these Web strategies are used within a political communication context. The data focus on how political parties (and their leaders) in Britain use Web 2.0 applications. We consider whether the content political elites published in their Web 2.0 applications is shovelware and more appropriate for Web 1.0, or if a genuinely Web 2.0 style of political communication is emerging. We investigate the extent to which there has been a shift in the way British politicians communicate or if caution over co-production, coupled with the demands of electioneering, is restricting the development of interactivity. Our analysis suggests that British political parties have sought to create a "Web 1.5" that offers the advantages of both Web 1.0 and Web 2.0. © Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

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