Face recognition is affected by similarity in spatial frequency range to a greater degree than within-category object recognition

This source preferred by Changhong Liu

This data was imported from PubMed:

Authors: Collin, C.A., Liu, C.H., Troje, N.F., McMullen, P.A. and Chaudhuri, A.

Journal: J Exp Psychol Hum Percept Perform

Volume: 30

Issue: 5

Pages: 975-987

ISSN: 0096-1523

DOI: 10.1037/0096-1523.30.5.975

Previous studies have suggested that face identification is more sensitive to variations in spatial frequency content than object recognition, but none have compared how sensitive the 2 processes are to variations in spatial frequency overlap (SFO). The authors tested face and object matching accuracy under varying SFO conditions. Their results showed that object recognition was more robust to SFO variations than face recognition and that the vulnerability of faces was not due to reliance on configural processing. They suggest that variations in sensitivity to SFO help explain the vulnerability of face recognition to changes in image format and the lack of a middle-frequency advantage in object recognition.

This data was imported from Scopus:

Authors: Collin, C.A., Liu, C.H., McMullen, P.A., Troje, N.F. and Chaudhuri, A.

Journal: Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance

Volume: 30

Issue: 5

Pages: 975-987

ISSN: 0096-1523

DOI: 10.1037/0096-1523.30.5.975

Previous studies have suggested that face identification is more sensitive to variations in spatial frequency content than object recognition, but none have compared how sensitive the 2 processes are to variations in spatial frequency overlap (SFO). The authors tested face and object matching accuracy under varying SFO conditions. Their results showed that object recognition was more robust to SFO variations than face recognition and that the vulnerability of faces was not due to reliance on configural processing. They suggest that variations in sensitivity to SFO help explain the vulnerability of face recognition to changes in image format and the lack of a middle-frequency advantage in object recognition.

This data was imported from Web of Science (Lite):

Authors: Collin, C.A., Liu, C.H., Troje, N.F., McMullen, P.A. and Chaudhuri, A.

Journal: JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY-HUMAN PERCEPTION AND PERFORMANCE

Volume: 30

Issue: 5

Pages: 975-987

ISSN: 0096-1523

DOI: 10.1037/0096-1523.30.5.975

This data was imported from Europe PubMed Central:

Authors: Collin, C.A., Liu, C.H., Troje, N.F., McMullen, P.A. and Chaudhuri, A.

Journal: Journal of experimental psychology. Human perception and performance

Volume: 30

Issue: 5

Pages: 975-987

eISSN: 1939-1277

ISSN: 0096-1523

Previous studies have suggested that face identification is more sensitive to variations in spatial frequency content than object recognition, but none have compared how sensitive the 2 processes are to variations in spatial frequency overlap (SFO). The authors tested face and object matching accuracy under varying SFO conditions. Their results showed that object recognition was more robust to SFO variations than face recognition and that the vulnerability of faces was not due to reliance on configural processing. They suggest that variations in sensitivity to SFO help explain the vulnerability of face recognition to changes in image format and the lack of a middle-frequency advantage in object recognition.

The data on this page was last updated at 04:45 on January 17, 2018.